It is currently April 26th, 2017, 9:28 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: New Northernmost Entry
PostPosted: July 1st, 2016, 3:22 pm 
User avatar

Joined: January 7th, 2013, 10:31 pm
Posts: 112
Location: Alaska
Moved Wood Frog records one degree of latitude North and knocked off another Alaska borough. 90 miles short of the Arctic Circle. I'll get one above it one of these days.

http://www.naherp.com/viewrecord.php?r_id=260105


Top
 Profile WWW 
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: New Northernmost Entry
PostPosted: July 2nd, 2016, 9:34 am 
User avatar

Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:41 am
Posts: 4618
Location: "Buy My Books"-land
Congratulations! That's really cool. :thumb:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: New Northernmost Entry
PostPosted: July 2nd, 2016, 8:26 pm 
User avatar

Joined: January 7th, 2013, 10:31 pm
Posts: 112
Location: Alaska
Thank you, and thank you for your two kingsnake books, I found them very helpful when I was in California.


Top
 Profile WWW 
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: New Northernmost Entry
PostPosted: July 3rd, 2016, 10:01 am 
User avatar

Joined: October 18th, 2010, 7:55 pm
Posts: 631
Location: San Diego, CA
Well done Jamez!

Do you think global warming is expanding wood frogs range to the North?

Catch any fish in that same area?


Cheers,


Jeff


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: New Northernmost Entry
PostPosted: July 3rd, 2016, 10:57 am 

Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:42 am
Posts: 2197
Congratulations, James! Exciting entry!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: New Northernmost Entry
PostPosted: July 5th, 2016, 1:31 pm 
User avatar

Joined: January 7th, 2013, 10:31 pm
Posts: 112
Location: Alaska
Jeff- Other species that depend on forest ecosystems are expanding north of the Brooks Range and Arctic Circle as the tree line creeps further north along rivers and streams. This is documented in moose and snowshoe hare, and others. It wouldn't surprise me if wood frogs were able to do the same. However in many parts of Alaska, the warmer weather is also bringing less snowfall-- or at least causing the snowpack to melt at intervals and expose bare ground to later cold periods. Dormant wood frogs rely on deep snow to insulate them from extreme subzero temps that would otherwise kill them despite the natural antifreeze in their body. So there has been some concern that wood frog populations up here might suffer. As far as I know, it's all theoretical. The University of Alaska studies them pretty extensively with an eye toward exploiting their antifreeze properties for medical purposes and the last I read was that if the frogs are frozen much below zero, the survival rate plummets. Based on that various local sources have concluded that the type of winters that we've been having (little snow, periodic melt-offs, bare ground in January and February) must hurt their populations. But I haven't seen any population studies to support the assumption. I couldn't say objectively whether I see less of them than I did as a kid. I spend less time looking for them, but they still reliably turn up in all the same places they used to.

Caught a few grayling up that way, but it was a bit early and the fish hadn't moved into their summer feeding areas in large numbers so fishing was slow.


Top
 Profile WWW 
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: