Canon mid-level DSLR

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Mike VanValen
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Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by Mike VanValen » January 8th, 2014, 6:04 pm

The short story - I tried a Nikon D5000 for a year, took some decent pics but I felt it didn't fit me. I'd like to give a Canon a try. Any recommendations for a mid-level DSLR?

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Hunter-MX
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Re: Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by Hunter-MX » January 8th, 2014, 6:58 pm

I just picked up the new Canon 70D. Only had it about a week so far but I think it is an excellent camera. It has a lot of features that have really set the bar on Prosumer level DSLR's.

J-Miz
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Re: Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by J-Miz » January 8th, 2014, 7:32 pm

Tons of options. Are you only interested in buying new, or are you open to buying used? What is your budget on the camera body only (remember-- lenses, flashes, cards, support, etc all add up more than the body)? I know nothing about Nikon, but why didn't the D5000 fit you?

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Mike VanValen
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Re: Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by Mike VanValen » January 8th, 2014, 7:47 pm

I am definitely open to used, and probably will go with used. The Nikon doesn't have an auto-focus motor. I don't like my options limited but otherwise it was decent.

Budget wise for a camera body would be in the $800 range.

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chrish
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Re: Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by chrish » January 9th, 2014, 6:16 am

Mike VanValen wrote:I am definitely open to used, and probably will go with used. The Nikon doesn't have an auto-focus motor. I don't like my options limited but otherwise it was decent.

Budget wise for a camera body would be in the $800 range.
Your Nikon Body doesn't have an autofocus motor in it but most of them do. It requires a lens with an AF motor inside of it. Most Nikon lenses and 3rd party lenses sold today have this feature. It is a much more efficient way to focus a lens actually. Only the older Nikon lenses lack this feature.

You really might consider that for the same $800 you could buy a lens (or two) that will autofocus with your camera body and not have to change systems. You could also just buy another used Nikon body which has the AF motor in the body and keep the lens(es) you currently own.

Other than not autofocusing a few older lenses, the 5100 seems to be a great camera. Consider what the dpreview conclusion regarding image quality said (albeit, a few years ago)
At low ISO settings, the D5100 is on a par with the best of the competition, but at the higher ISO settings, it produces some of the best image quality that we've ever seen from an APS-C camera.
For me, high ISO image quality would trump autofocus flexibility 100% of the time. I wouldn't sacrifice that if I had the choice.
I'm not for or against the Nikon system (or Canon), but it seems like there is a lot going for the camera you have if you could just get a lens that will autofocus, and most will.

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Mike VanValen
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Re: Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by Mike VanValen » January 9th, 2014, 9:26 am

I sold the D5000 and all of my Nikon gear.

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Re: Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by fvachss » January 9th, 2014, 11:30 am

Most of the Canon crop bodies over the last 3-4 years have used the same 18MP sensor and will produce similar image quality. These include the T2i - T5i Rebels, the 60D mid-range and the 7D "semi-pro" body (and pretty much includes the 70D - a 60D replacement with a slightly higher res 20MP sensor). The difference among these is physical size and weight, build quality, type of memory (SD vs. CF) and a range of features that may or may not matter to you (shutter speed range, AF speed and customizability, etc). On the used market these will all run somewhere in the $400-800 range and you can choose which fits your budget, hand size and shooting style best.

A more expensive, but genuinely higher quality, alternative is to go FF with a used 6D or 5D2 (both of which will run somewhere in the $12-1400 used last I looked).

Lots of options. They're all capable of taking great pictures. The rest is up to you.

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Re: Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by J-Miz » January 10th, 2014, 6:27 am

Indeed...tons of options. I've used the following Canon bodies, not all of them extensively, some just to play with briefly and sell for a profit:

Rebels (1.6x crop): Xti, T1i
Semi-pro 1.6x: 20D, 30D, 40D, 50D, 7D
APS-H (1.3x crop): 1D Mark III
FF: 5D Mark II

They are all good cameras, perfectly capable of taking excellent pictures. You need to decide if you want a crop camera or full-frame, whether or not you want video, how important AF speed is, how rugged a body you need, and so forth.

I started with the XTi; it was a great camera but gear acquisition syndrome :lol: led me to upgrade to the 40D. I liked the larger size, more rugged body, and the ISO options broken into one-third stops. I moved to the 50D as I shoot birds and often crop (it gave me 50% more megapixels as well as a beautiful high resolution LCD). A nice upgrade, which eventually led me to the 7D (a few more megapixels, much better AF, and HD video). I found a deal on a 1D mark III and had to jump on it. I was amazed by how much better the ISO performance was, as well as AF, build of the body, etc. Despite having 10mp compared to the 7D's 18mp...and only a 1.3x crop compared to 1.6x (and no video, crappy LCD resolution) I sold the 7D. I have since found a deal on a 5D mk II and also use that. Resolution is awesome...and using a FF is pretty sweet as well. But the AF is horrendous compared to the 1D mark III.

The point here is that no camera has it all (well, maybe the $6000 1DX). Used, you can have a T3i or SL1 for probably $300 or so, a Canon 60D for $550, a Canon 1D mark IIn for $475, a Canon 1D III for $850, a Canon 1Ds Mark II for $800, a Canon 5D for $450, or a Canon 5D Mark II for about $1000. Those are some models I'd look at.

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jason folt
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Re: Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by jason folt » January 13th, 2014, 11:06 am

Seems like a pretty silly reason to change systems all together. There were plenty of other Nikon options that would have fit your other gear.

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Re: Canon mid-level DSLR

Post by azatrox » February 7th, 2014, 11:44 am

Mike,

If you're no longer invested in either system and want to give Canon a shot, you'll find plenty of options available.

For a mid range crop sensor, the T2i-T5i bodies are all capable of producing excellent images.

With crop sensors, the biggest limitation is ISO performance owing to the smaller sensor size....

I picked up the 7D last year and am thrilled with it....It's a 1.6x crop sensor, but it really outdoes any other crop body in terms of ISO performance IMO. I worked with both the Canon XTi and the XSi previously, and both bodies show noticeable noise at ISO 800 or so...With the 7D whatever noise I see @ ISO 800 can easily be addressed in post processing.

If I had 800.00 to burn on a camera body, I'd go 7D in a heartbeat. You can get a used one with low actuations for about that much. (I picked mine up used for about 900.00).

- Kris

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