11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

A lot of field herpers seem to go fishing, or maintain aquariums, as much as they do herp! Any and all things fish are welcome in this forum.

Moderator: Scott Waters

Post Reply
User avatar
Kent VanSooy
Posts: 1100
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:51 am
Location: Oceanside

11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Kent VanSooy » December 10th, 2011, 1:08 pm

18 anglers left the day after Thanksgiving for an 11-day journey to the lower banks off Baja California aboard the sportfisher Intrepid. Preparation is key to a successful venture, and it looked like we would be ready.
Image
The “red shirts” at the landing hustled to load the gear into carts for the trip down the ramp to the boat.
Image
Several resident felines had already begun a lazy day at the docks. Life is good here!
Image
And here comes our conveyance around the corner, now filled with fuel and bait.
Image
After a year of planning and waiting, it was finally time to board.
Image
We shoved off and made it past the point, but an honest mistake led to some missing medication, and we headed back to the bait receiver to await its arrival. It was a nice day for sailing.
Image
Downtown San Diego was resplendent in the distance.
Image
A submarine was docked near the bait receiver.
Image
As we approached the receiver, it was apparent a party was already in progress!
Image
But the guests didn’t appreciate us crashing their party.
Image
I hadn’t realized it, but there’s a thriving seal tourism industry.
Image
All necks were craned aboard the harbor cruise ship towards the seals as well.
Image
I guess they are sorta cute (when they’re not mangling fish at the end of my line).
Image
A little gap in the wood covering the bait receiver was a fertile hunting ground for the resident birds.
Image
A snowy egret got in on the action.
Image
A gull wheeling overhead was looking for his chance to swipe a sardine.
Image
Yup, life is good in San Diego Bay.
Image
Finally the needed medicine arrived (and we’re still going to beat the Red Rooster away from the docks).
Image
We enjoyed the first of many glorious sunsets we’d see on the journey.
Image
A couple days later we reached the Uncle Sam bank, where Bob had the chance to put a bend in his rod.
Image
It was a fish, but not the quality we were looking for, so it was released and we continued to head south.
Image
We awoke at 3:00 am the next morning in Magdalena Bay to catch mackerel for bait. They bit well, and we filled the tank in an hour.
Image
The water temp was up to 70 degrees now, and it was time to troll for wahoo.
Image
But the pickings on the wahoo were slim (meaning non-existent), so anglers just relaxed and enjoyed the view.
Image
We located a dead seal, which held a few dorado. Here’s Anthony pulling on one…
Image
…and Mike watching his come over the rail.
Image
The action dried up fairly quickly, so we continued on our way, until we found….THE ROPE. It was an old tow rope, and held no less than a bazillion dorado. As soon as a bait hit the water, multiple dorado would fight over it, trying to be the first to inhale the sardine. It was as wide open as fishing gets! Note the free swimmers – there were everywhere.
Image
A nice bull came to gaff.
Image
It took maybe 30 minutes to reach our boat limits. After the success, Kona Mike hams it up for the camera.
Image
The rope presented a navigation hazard, so Captain Mike Pritchard wanted to tie it into a tighter bunch.
Image
The amount of life in and around it was incredible – a sea turtle initially was resting in the middle.
Image
Deckhand Dave went over the side to begin the work of securing the rope.
Image
It was a beautiful object, with lovely shades of turquoise and emerald.
Image
This job is going to take two!
Image
Deckhands definitely know their knots.
Image
It was marked with a flag so other boats could share in our good fortune.
Image
Chartermaster Mark caught the only wahoo of the trip by casting a jig. I lost two jigs tied to mono on the sink; the ‘hoo then refused to bite a wired jig (of course).
Image
Image
The sunsets were just spectacular. Going…
Image
Going….
Image
Gone.
Image
And sunrise the next morning was every bit as scenic.
Image
Image
We were a long ways south now, and not too far off the beach.
Image
We dropped anchor and had the good fortune of catching lots of Pargo, which put up a decent fight and make fabulous table fare.
Image
There were nice yellowtail on the bottom too, but it typically took one of our mackerel to hook them.
Image
Here’s T pulling on a big yellow…
Image
….and his reward for getting it away from the rocks.
Image
A few grouper also came over the rail.
Image
This photo of deckhand Jason shows life aboard the Intrepid reflected in his sunglasses.
Image
We moved to a different bank, and finally begin to catch what we had come all this way for – tuna! Here’s Mark using the rail on one of the first ones to be hooked.
Image
Image
He eventually did subdue the fish.
Image
Our one lady angler Victoria captured an exceptionally attractive tuna.
Image
The fishing was scratchy, with periods of decent action, and times of no action.
Image
Fred hooked a nice one, which took him up to the bow.
Image
I held the camera over the side to try to catch the action, but Jason directed Fred’s attention to a UFO.
Image
OK, we’re settled down now.
Image
Fred’s fish is finally starting to get close…
Image
Closer…
Image
Got him!
Image
A blood-red sunrise greeted us the next day.
Image
Here’s Bob and Mike, working hard to get a bite.
Image
And Bob succeeded!
Image
With what turned out to be a striped marlin. It soon broke off.
Image
Skipjack were on the bank with the tuna, and ranged from a mild annoyance to making it impossible to fish – a bait wouldn’t make it past them. I thought I could get a big PL68 through them, but they grabbed that as well. We left for less infested waters.
Image
Looks like this Marauder has been bitten a time or two.
Image
Frigates always look so prehistoric.
Image
We caught a few yellowtail snapper on the reef, which was a fish I had never encountered. Even the crew said they had only seen a few over the years.
Image
Orange spectra makes it easy to see your line, but do something dumb, and you’re a marked man!
Image
Another beautiful yellowfin coming to gaff.
Image
Towards the end of the day, Mike and I both hooked what seemed to be nicer fish, but we got badly tangled in the corner, with another line wrapped around ours and holding the fish together. I was expecting to lose one or both, but the crew did an incredible job, and both made it aboard. Here’s mine…
Image
…and now Mike’s, which went 135# and turned out to be the jackpot fish.
Image
One of the tuna had this little puffer fish in its belly.
Image
Our last day of fishing was Friday, so I got up at 0:dark thirty to try some bottom fishing. It had been a decade since I caught a grouper, so I guess I was due! Captain Mike took this shot at sunrise.
Image
It was warm and calm – just a glorious morning.
Image
Bob subdued a really nice amberjack that morning.
Image
As we began out last tuna day, Herman finally got his first one on the line. He didn’t want to lose it, so was fighting it slowly and carefully.
Image
In the meantime, Bob hooked a tuna.
Image
Here’s Bob in a couple more of those hold-the-camera-over-the-rail shots.
Image
Image
And over the rail it comes.
Image
Herman’s fish had taken him up the side, but now he was back in the corner.
Image
Image
In the meantime, Mike hooked a good tuna.
Image
And over the rail it comes.
Image
Once again Herman’s fish had taken him up the side, and once again he was back at the corner. The deckhand is holding a gaff, he must be getting close!
Image
GOT HIM !!
Image
Believe it or not, this is the first fish that Jim had ever caught in his life. He would later get another on the kite.
Image
We finished the day, and ended up with about 50 of these nice tuna for the trip. Since it was time to start heading north, we were able to meet the Apollo the next morning and share our remaining bait.
Image
We had hoped for a yellowtail bite at Cedros Island…
Image
Image
….but it didn’t materialize. We did however anchor in the lee and enjoyed Javier’s incredible seafood buffet.
Image
Image
It’s an éclair highway! All roads lead to carrot cake.
Image
It was a long ride home, but we finally awoke to see the lights of San Diego Bay.
Image
What started out as a big-tuna trip turned into a wonderful variety trip.
Image
Up until this trip, Anthony’s best tuna was around 30#. Looks like he beat it!
Image
Dear viewer, if you made it this far, I’ll leave you with one final sunrise. I hope you enjoyed sharing our trip!
Image

User avatar
Dell Despain
Posts: 542
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 7:08 pm
Location: Montana

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Dell Despain » December 10th, 2011, 3:56 pm

Yeah Kent! Nice trip you took us on, looked like fun. I've caught a number of Grouper on flies before, and I think they all added up to your nice catch. That's a w-w-whopper.

-Dell

VICtort
Posts: 688
Joined: July 2nd, 2010, 5:48 pm
Location: AZ.

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by VICtort » December 10th, 2011, 11:51 pm

Dear Kent,

thanks for taking us aboard and down the Baja coast. The small fish being landed, the first photo of a fish, what is it? Looks like a "firecracker" yellowtail, but it has dark bands...is it a pilot fish? I will shoot you a PM, I am very interested to hear about life on the Intrepid. She seems to be a real consistent producer, and Javier is famous as one of if not the best galley man in the fleet.

Thanks for posting, for those not familiar, Kent covered most of the major events on a long range trip, but of course you just have to join him to feel the wind in your face, the slap of tuna tails on deck, the intensity of a "take" and the violence of a tuna bent rod. Notice how many guys are resting the rods on the rails...a little tired are the forearms? This really makes me want to go soon...

tight lines, Vic

hellihooks
Posts: 8025
Joined: June 8th, 2010, 7:12 am
Location: Hesperia, California.
Contact:

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by hellihooks » December 11th, 2011, 10:44 am

Very Cool Kent.
Do the grouper fight hard, or do you just lug them up? Did you name it Sea Bass tian? :crazyeyes: Sorry you didn't get a 'seal of approval' when leaving... :lol: :lol: :lol: (sorry... lotta lotta Mocha Latte) cyaaaa :D jim

User avatar
Jason B
Posts: 525
Joined: July 30th, 2010, 10:48 am
Location: KY: Woodford Co.

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Jason B » December 11th, 2011, 4:52 pm

Absolutely incredible. Thank you.

User avatar
Kent VanSooy
Posts: 1100
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:51 am
Location: Oceanside

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Kent VanSooy » December 11th, 2011, 5:02 pm

Dell, thanks - I've certainly enjoyed your fish tales on this board over the last couple years.

Vic, that was a little "rat" yellowtail. We also got a few barracuda, and a couple smaller yellowfin at Uncle Sam Bank. I'm a confirmed rail fishermen now - I brought my harness along, but never put it on - I feel so much more mobile without it.

Jim, if you can win the first 10 second of a fight with a grouper, you'll get 'em. After they grab your bait, they'll head to a rock cave in the reef, and if they make it, your line will be frayed and cut against the rock. So they're fished with a really tight drag, with the angler ready to pull REALLY hard after the bite. I keep the rod tip under my arm, and immediately drop to my knees after the bite to get that first important couple of feet.

Jason, thanks! Glad you enjoyed it.

User avatar
pete
Posts: 745
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:11 pm
Location: cape cod ma.

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by pete » December 12th, 2011, 4:04 pm

Fantastic post of a fantastic trip!! Thanks for sharing the warm weather and all the action!

User avatar
Jeff Lemm
Posts: 411
Joined: June 8th, 2010, 7:08 pm

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Jeff Lemm » December 13th, 2011, 8:24 am

great work, now I'm fired up to fish again!

User avatar
Bob
Posts: 127
Joined: November 1st, 2011, 12:35 pm
Location: livingston MT

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Bob » December 15th, 2011, 3:12 pm

My back might last one day! :lol:

I'd save it for the mahi no doubt.

User avatar
Joshua Jones
Posts: 413
Joined: August 31st, 2011, 1:33 pm
Location: Vanderbilt, Michigan

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Joshua Jones » December 18th, 2011, 2:11 am

Right on!!! Like I said in an earlier thread, I used to fish off Baja every year with that outfit. On the Daily Double and the Point Loma, actually. Those guys really know their stuff and try their best to put you on some good fish. Plus it's nice letting them clean your catch for you.lol Did you guys have any problems with sealions? I ask because we always had problems with them, one of them even costing my little brother his own pot-winning tuna. Thanks for the post, man. Seeing that stuff was a real blast from the past. :thumb:

User avatar
Kent VanSooy
Posts: 1100
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:51 am
Location: Oceanside

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Kent VanSooy » December 18th, 2011, 11:40 am

Thanks gents! The sea lions were only a minor factor, but did get a couple of the smaller fish (I don't think they'd even try with one of those big tuna). We did hook a few hammerhead sharks (I got one about 100#, was definitely hoping it was something else!), but they didn't bite any of the hooked fish. Our hooked-to-catch ratio was really good this trip.

User avatar
Curtis Hart
Posts: 595
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 4:07 pm
Location: Hillsdale County, Michigan

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Curtis Hart » December 19th, 2011, 5:54 pm

That looked like a great trip. Thanks for taking us along. Do you see any offshore dolphin species on those trips? If so what and how often? Thanks,



Curtis

User avatar
Kent VanSooy
Posts: 1100
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:51 am
Location: Oceanside

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Kent VanSooy » December 20th, 2011, 7:34 am

We didn't see many dolphin at all - a couple pods of blackies, and a few pacific white-sided dolphin. I love seeing Spinners, but we didn't encounter those. We didn't fish the tuna under dophin, rather we were anchored on high spots and chummed them to the boat.

User avatar
monklet
Posts: 2648
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 3:44 pm
Location: Ventura, CA
Contact:

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by monklet » December 31st, 2011, 9:03 am

Great story telling Kent! Thanks :beer:

Asnyder
Posts: 91
Joined: February 26th, 2011, 10:48 am
Location: Oxford, Mississippi/ Owings Mills, MD
Contact:

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Asnyder » January 19th, 2012, 7:16 pm

What a remarkable post! Brings me back to a decade ago of charter fishing the panhandle of FL. Thank you for sharing.

millside
Posts: 586
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 5:22 pm

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by millside » February 9th, 2012, 7:57 am

enjoyed the entire post, thanks

User avatar
KingCam
Posts: 1020
Joined: April 11th, 2011, 12:03 pm

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by KingCam » February 10th, 2012, 9:31 am

Incredible! Why did I read this at lunch time?! I'm SO hungry for some fresh coastal seafood now. The sushi in Missouri just doesn't cut it :'(

User avatar
Kent VanSooy
Posts: 1100
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:51 am
Location: Oceanside

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Kent VanSooy » February 10th, 2012, 12:32 pm

Thank you gentlemen! I cooked some of the Mahi earlier this week - YUM. And fillets from those big tuna are almost like a hunk of beef - dark and thick.

User avatar
Hans Breuer (twoton)
Posts: 3206
Joined: June 8th, 2010, 2:19 am
Location: Kuching, Sarawak (Borneo)
Contact:

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Hans Breuer (twoton) » February 10th, 2012, 6:24 pm

Even though I lived in one of the world's most fishing-crazed countries - Taiwan - for over two decades, I've always found angling stupendously boring.

But this report just made me want to try it myself! Fantastic!!

A few inane outsider questions:

- do all of you have huge iceboxes in your cars to transport the fish home after the trip?

- those of you who came by air - how did you get your fish back home?

- How do you keep eighteen testosterone-laden people (save Victoria) on a small boat with a hatch full of beer from going at each other's throats during the downtimes? Or do you fish 24/7?

PS: You had me at "Kirin Ichiban" :-)

Thanks again!!

User avatar
Kent VanSooy
Posts: 1100
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:51 am
Location: Oceanside

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Kent VanSooy » February 13th, 2012, 4:43 pm

Hans, glad you enjoyed it! These trips are tons of fun.

When fish are caught on the boat, they're tagged with the angler's number, then refrigerated for the trip home. Once the boat reaches the dock, the angler can either take 'em with them (using huge iceboxes), or they can use one of several commercial fish processors. That's what I do - a representative is there at the landing, and they transport your fish to their factory where you can pick it up a little later that day, filleted and vacuum-sealed.
For the people who travel by air (and it's a good percentage of them), they'll have the fish processors ship them their catch (frozen) when it's ready.

There's a fair amount of downtime - on this 11-day trip, about half the time was spent traveling and not fishing. On the way down the crew conducts tackle and technique seminars, and the anglers fuss over their gear and prepare for the action ahead. The galley serves up fantastic food, and plenty of time is spent enjoying that. There are several big-screen TVs in the galley as well, which receive satellite feed along with the DVR. Personally, I really enjoy reading on these trips, and usually go through at least a couple books. The anglers sleep in staterooms, two per room, so you can close the door and get away for awhile if you want. Beer is cheap (a buck each), which helps everyone get along just fine!

User avatar
Hans Breuer (twoton)
Posts: 3206
Joined: June 8th, 2010, 2:19 am
Location: Kuching, Sarawak (Borneo)
Contact:

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Hans Breuer (twoton) » February 13th, 2012, 5:23 pm

Thanks! That sounds like a real holiday!

VICtort
Posts: 688
Joined: July 2nd, 2010, 5:48 pm
Location: AZ.

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by VICtort » February 13th, 2012, 11:13 pm

Dear Hans,

""....angling stupendously boring"...Blasphemy! It is so different with me...have you ever fished in a productive area? For me, feeling a stessed out/chased mackeral thrumming the rod, and seeing the line melt off the reel when a 100lb.+ tuna grabs it or tears it off the kite is one of the most exciting things imaginable, a totally addictive adrenaline rush. Or the sheer violence of a big yellowtail or wahoo taking the jig you were reeling in as fast as you can...your rod doubles over and you hang on with all your strength. For true anglers, even the hope and finally a suttle take from wary fish (selectivesteelhead/trout in gin clear water on a tiny fly) is exciting...I would really encourage you to get on a hot bite sometime and see if you still think it boring. Not catching fish and not having hope of catching them indeed might be boring...but I always have hope. Focus on mackerals, jacks, tuna, all are thrilling and usually not too fussy when you find them. Kent as you know and I both go on some long range fising trips where we have very sophisticated vessels designed to find them, often traveling hundreds of miles in pursuit of good fishing. I have recently had a good time taking little kids fishing for small fish....they are so thrilled! I sometimes catch small fish for bait, and it is hard to stop when they are biting well, I just get some kind of primal thrill from a fish biting...but of course big fish biting is even better. I hope you will hook up with some experienced anglers and try it again...I just don't often feel bored.

Everything Kent said is so...the boats treat you well, the food is gourmet and abundant, and the travel time is filled with preparation of leaders and rigs, and new knots to learn, hilarious and edifying fishing stories, jokes etc. As social or relaxing as you like, you can hide out and catch up on sleep (which you will miss when you are fishing day and night on the grounds) or party...for me the "forced relaxation" is a good thing, but I am so wired with adrenaline the time passes quickly. As you said, it is a real vaction, all you have to do is fish and eat and sleep, no phones or worries...and the crew takes responsibility for the vessel maintenance, navigation, hassles.

I used to clean my own fish, we took them home (a ton or more) in a horse trailer filled with snow ice and covered with old sleeping bags...it worked but now that I can better afford it, I have the processors do it, they do great work and the product is first class, frozen and/or smoked etc.

User avatar
Hans Breuer (twoton)
Posts: 3206
Joined: June 8th, 2010, 2:19 am
Location: Kuching, Sarawak (Borneo)
Contact:

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Hans Breuer (twoton) » February 13th, 2012, 11:47 pm

Thanks, Mr. VICtort!
VICtort wrote: ""....angling stupendously boring"...Blasphemy! It is so different with me...have you ever fished in a productive area? For me, feeling a stessed out/chased mackeral thrumming the rod, and seeing the line melt off the reel when a 100lb.+ tuna grabs it or tears it off the kite is one of the most exciting things imaginable, a totally addictive adrenaline rush. Or the sheer violence of a big yellowtail or wahoo taking the jig you were reeling in as fast as you can...your rod doubles over and you hang on with all your strength. For true anglers, even the hope and finally a suttle take from wary fish (selectivesteelhead/trout in gin clear water on a tiny fly) is exciting...I would really encourage you to get on a hot bite sometime and see if you still think it boring. Not catching fish and not having hope of catching them indeed might be boring...but I always have hope. Focus on mackerals, jacks, tuna, all are thrilling and usually not too fussy when you find them. Kent as you know and I both go on some long range fising trips where we have very sophisticated vessels designed to find them, often traveling hundreds of miles in pursuit of good fishing. I have recently had a good time taking little kids fishing for small fish....they are so thrilled! I sometimes catch small fish for bait, and it is hard to stop when they are biting well, I just get some kind of primal thrill from a fish biting...but of course big fish biting is even better.
Replace the fish with various sorts of reptiles and amphibian, and it sounds just like herping to me. Serves the same primal instinct - hunting. Now if they only would come up with big herping buses kitted out with all the amenities a tour boat has :-)

VICtort
Posts: 688
Joined: July 2nd, 2010, 5:48 pm
Location: AZ.

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by VICtort » February 14th, 2012, 6:25 am

Hans Breuer (twoton) wrote:Thanks, Mr. VICtort!
VICtort wrote: ""....angling stupendously boring"...Blasphemy! It is so different with me...have you ever fished in a productive area? For me, feeling a stessed out/chased mackeral thrumming the rod, and seeing the line melt off the reel when a 100lb.+ tuna grabs it or tears it off the kite is one of the most exciting things imaginable, a totally addictive adrenaline rush. Or the sheer violence of a big yellowtail or wahoo taking the jig you were reeling in as fast as you can...your rod doubles over and you hang on with all your strength. For true anglers, even the hope and finally a suttle take from wary fish (selectivesteelhead/trout in gin clear water on a tiny fly) is exciting...I would really encourage you to get on a hot bite sometime and see if you still think it boring. Not catching fish and not having hope of catching them indeed might be boring...but I always have hope. Focus on mackerals, jacks, tuna, all are thrilling and usually not too fussy when you find them. Kent as you know and I both go on some long range fising trips where we have very sophisticated vessels designed to find them, often traveling hundreds of miles in pursuit of good fishing. I have recently had a good time taking little kids fishing for small fish....they are so thrilled! I sometimes catch small fish for bait, and it is hard to stop when they are biting well, I just get some kind of primal thrill from a fish biting...but of course big fish biting is even better.
Replace the fish with various sorts of reptiles and amphibian, and it sounds just like herping to me. Serves the same primal instinct - hunting. Now if they only would come up with big herping buses kitted out with all the amenities a tour boat has :-)
Dear Hans, I have often made a similar comparison. That is why so many of us enjoy Baja, Mexico, as it offers some of the best of both, ocean and desert and mountains, herping and fishing and diving. Many of the skills are similar, but I have only had a few days of over 50 reptiles seen, whereas I have had many fishing days of almost unlimited numbers/action. I fish when it is calm and herp when the ocean is hostile/windy. The skills I acquired as a young kid, noosing and approaching wary lizards, seeing cryptic/camoflaged reptiles, looking into cracks and caves etc. were great training for diving/spear fishing hobby to follow. I also enjoying eating fish as well as catching them. We are fortunate to have the "gene" that makes us enjoy hunting and gathering in the natural state...the thrill of the chase and discovery are an addictive elixir for sure...Vic

User avatar
Kent VanSooy
Posts: 1100
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:51 am
Location: Oceanside

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Kent VanSooy » February 14th, 2012, 10:45 am

Indeed, the parallels between fishing and herping are plentiful! You know that feeling when you first see a snake in the road far in front of you – a jolt of excitement, combined with that delicious uncertainty of not knowing exactly what species it is? When a gamefish grabs your bait and starts peeling line off your reel, it’s very much the same. It could be something you’ve seen and caught a bunch of times, or it could be the catch of a lifetime. With fishing, that uncertainty may last a half-hour or more, and you stand a decent chance of never finding out should you or your tackle fail. The beginning of a fishing day reminds me so much of the start of a herping day. You analyze the conditions, think about the weather, the season, and what is was like last week. You share a laugh with your companions, and have high hopes for a successful venture. And after you’ve become an accomplished angler or herper, you realize you don’t know as much as you think you do, and that herping and fishing are really just great excuses to get outside and have fun. If you find or catch something, it’s that much sweeter.

User avatar
Hans Breuer (twoton)
Posts: 3206
Joined: June 8th, 2010, 2:19 am
Location: Kuching, Sarawak (Borneo)
Contact:

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by Hans Breuer (twoton) » February 14th, 2012, 3:36 pm

What I said :-)

User avatar
James K.
Posts: 20
Joined: February 11th, 2012, 5:45 pm
Location: Toledo, Ohio

Re: 11 days to Baja, aboard the Intrepid

Post by James K. » February 14th, 2012, 4:46 pm

wow amazing fish. fishings probably the only thing more fun than herping to me.

Post Reply