Birder in the making.

All things winged, in the field or your own private aviary.

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Josh Young
Posts: 262
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 8:59 pm
Location: Wakulla County, Florida
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Birder in the making.

Post by Josh Young »

As of late I have taken more interest in birding, or rather photographing birds more often. With the purchase of the 70-300mm Nikkor lens it's really caused me to seek out birds more often than what I used to. So I figured I'd share some of the birds I've come across since the purchase of the lens, mostly common stuff from a local Environmental Preserve, that has been recently converted from an empty lot 3 years or so ago, and it's mostly catered towards birds. There are a few from different areas like ENP and such. Hope y'all enjoy.

Not taken with the 70-300mm, as this was from before I purchased it, but I thought it was a really nice photo. I believe the birds to be crows. They can be seen in this area somewhat regularly as sunset, seemingly roosting.

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Crows roosting. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


The same day I purchased the lens from my work, I came home and was greeted by this male Painted bunting. He and a female had been hanging around the area for a week or so, and continued to do so until their wintering time here was up. I already posted him here before so I will just stick to one photo of him.

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Painted bunting. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

His lady friend.

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Female painted bunting. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Screech owl. This little guy use to be my nightly companion at my previous residence. He would accompany me as I would walk around in the yard photographing any critters that might be encountered.

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Screech owl. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Great blue heron from ENP.

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Great blue heron. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Osprey in it's nest.

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Young osprey in nest. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Laughing gulls from the docks at Flamingo.


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Laughing gulls. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Little blue heron from Flamingo.

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Little blue heron. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Red-shouldered hawk from along the main road.

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Red-shouldered hawk. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Came across this kestrel back home one night while shining for snakes in the structure he was sleeping in.

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American kestrel. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


A nice uncropped portrait of an osprey.

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Osprey. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Another osprey from more recent, from the trail at Flamingo. He was being harassed by a vulture, who eventually convinced the young osprey to give up his well earned speckled trout meal.

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DSC_2583 by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Osprey with speckled trout. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Osprey with speckled trout. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Red-shouldered hawk from Kissimmee Praire.

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Red-shouldered hawk. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Crested caracara from the same area.

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Crested caracara. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

Same bird, he was initially come across in this manner, his meal there was a recently hit Eastern diamondback.

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Crested caracara. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


What I believe are two Caspian terns. From ENP.

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Caspian tern. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Blue-winged teal. ENP.

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Blue-winged teal. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr



From back home, I was fishing a canal when this limpkin and her chicks swam by to get around me.

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Limpkin with chicks. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Finally managed to get photos of my favorite owl, the barn owl.

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Barn owl. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Barn owl. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


While fishing one afternoon on my usual road for fishing, I saw these guys hanging out together. Roseate spoonbill and a wood stork.

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Roseate spoonbill with a wood stork. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


From the Environmental area I spend time in frequently as of late, this trio of fishers were hanging out on the same boardwalk.

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Trio of fishers. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Common moorehens are very common in this area.

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Common moorehen. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Common moorehen. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


And occasionally so are Purple Gallinules.

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Purple gallinule. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


The preserve has a 70 foot observation tower that is all the way in the very back of the preserve.

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Observation tower at Wellington Environmental Preserve. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Tri-colored heron.

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Tri-colored heron. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Tri-colored heron. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Barred owls are commonly encountered in a WMA I spend a lot of time in.

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Barred owl. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Just the other morning I was out fishing and between fishing spots I came across a group of roseate spoonbills in a group of wood storks. Sadly I wasn't able to get the shots I had hoped for, before I could get across the road, some dumb blonde lady scared them off as she was trying to play photographer with her iPhone. I did get these photos though.

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Roseate spoonbills and wood storks. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Roseat spoonbill. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Roseate spoonbill. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Roseate spoonbills. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


So after fishing died down I went into the Preserve hoping the spoonbills made their way there. No such luck.


Did see a lot of what I presume to be mottled ducks. There is even a gallinule in the first photo.

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Mottled ducks. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Mottled ducks. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Had this trio of glossy ibis fly over.

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Trio of glossy ibis. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Loggerhead shrikes are common all along this road and in the Preserve.

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Loggerhead shrike. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Loggerhead shrike. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Loggerhead shrike. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


Blue jays are equally common in the morning in the Preserve.

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Blue jay. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Blue jay. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


On the way home that same morning there were a few of these exotic noisy little buggers hanging out on the power line. Finally got some decent photos of them. Monk parakeets, or as usually referred to, quakers.

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Monk parakeet. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr

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Monk parakeet. by Joshua W. Young, on Flickr


That's it for now, there will be more in the future, as my interest has significantly grown, and I find myself spending more time birding lately than herping, mainly since herping hasn't been all that great for me lately. Well I hope y'all enjoyed. Thanks for looking.

User avatar
pete
Posts: 745
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:11 pm
Location: cape cod ma.

Re: Birder in the making.

Post by pete »

You've got some great shots!!!

Love the spooner in flight ! :thumb:

BethH
Posts: 112
Joined: May 12th, 2013, 5:47 pm

Re: Birder in the making.

Post by BethH »

Beautiful pictures.

About the owl pictures, I assume you are using flash. Do you worry about the bird not being able to see to hunt after the flash, for a while? How close are you that the flash is actually effective?

reptileexperts
Posts: 64
Joined: July 4th, 2013, 2:21 pm

Re: Birder in the making.

Post by reptileexperts »

BethH wrote:Beautiful pictures.

About the owl pictures, I assume you are using flash. Do you worry about the bird not being able to see to hunt after the flash, for a while? How close are you that the flash is actually effective?
:lol: I use flashes on Owls without worry, even when used with a better beamer to extend its range. The duration of light is short, and not bright enough to effectively harm the bird unless you distracted it while it was in process of something.

BethH
Posts: 112
Joined: May 12th, 2013, 5:47 pm

Re: Birder in the making.

Post by BethH »

reptileexperts wrote:
BethH wrote:Beautiful pictures.

About the owl pictures, I assume you are using flash. Do you worry about the bird not being able to see to hunt after the flash, for a while? How close are you that the flash is actually effective?
:lol: I use flashes on Owls without worry, even when used with a better beamer to extend its range. The duration of light is short, and not bright enough to effectively harm the bird unless you distracted it while it was in process of something.

Nice.

I really like the picture of the curious blue jay.

User avatar
MattSullivan
Posts: 419
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 1:07 pm
Location: New Jersey

Re: Birder in the making.

Post by MattSullivan »

that red screech owl is awesome

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