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Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 14th, 2016, 8:31 am
by Brian Hubbs
A friend shared this handy chart with me. I find it very helpful. Maybe you will too... :lol:

Image

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 14th, 2016, 2:16 pm
by Brian Hubbs
Wow, this forum is DEAD! 18 views and nobody thought that was funny? I give up...

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 14th, 2016, 6:09 pm
by nightdriver
I don't get it....



Just kidding...wish I'd created it.. :lol: :lol:

It's missing Pine.... ;)

nightdriver

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 14th, 2016, 6:49 pm
by Porter
I don't see what cartoon tadpoles have to with this... :|

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 14th, 2016, 7:30 pm
by Brian Hubbs
:lol:

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 14th, 2016, 8:29 pm
by nightdriver
Those aren't stingrays?

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 15th, 2016, 9:52 am
by intermedius
Empids, the Desmognathus of the birding world.

- Justin

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 15th, 2016, 10:18 am
by cbernz
I know they're all the same color, but when I look at this graphic and my eyes scan from head to head, they appear to be slightly different shades of brown. Anyone else notice this optical illusion?

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 15th, 2016, 10:20 am
by cbernz
intermedius wrote:Empids, the Desmognathus of the birding world.

- Justin
Except salamanders don't have distinctive call notes.

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 15th, 2016, 12:59 pm
by Brian Hubbs
It's all the fault of DNA...and the fact that some empids lisp when they call, and people erroneously thought those speech impeded birds were a different species...

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 15th, 2016, 8:47 pm
by chrish
Those pictures are misleading. How am I supposed to estimate primary extensions from those drawings?

I actually like empids, and I live in an area where they almost never call (during migration).

And if you are really having trouble, buy an older field guide. Western and Traill's Flycatchers are easier to ID that Alder, Willow, Cordilleran and Pacific Slope Flycatchers!

But the big bonus is that they are the easiest birds to photograph.

Traill's Flycatcher

Image

Acadian Flycatcher -

Image

Dusky Flycatcher -

Image

Hammond's Flycatcher -

Image

Least Flycatcher -

Image

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher -

Image


Besides, if you do label your empid photos, it isn't like anyone can prove you are wrong!

But if you get too good at ID'ing these, you can move on to Prions or the European Warblers. :lol:

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 19th, 2016, 9:50 am
by Brian Hubbs
What is a Trail's flycatcher? My book doesn't list it. Is it south of the border? If so, I don't need to worry about that one... :lol:

Oh, nice pics by the way...

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 19th, 2016, 11:02 am
by monklet
It was the name of the Acadian/Willow Flycatcher group before they split. Birds in field can only be reliably separated by call.

As for empid identification in general, I suspect they are often misidentified, even sometimes by the most skillful birders when no vocalization is given.

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 19th, 2016, 11:22 am
by Brian Hubbs
Thanks!

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 19th, 2016, 8:41 pm
by chrish
monklet wrote:As for empid identification in general, I suspect they are often misidentified, even sometimes by the most skillful birders when no vocalization is given.
Agreed. There are some empids, particularly south of the border, that are easy to ID but I doubt anyone who says they can correctly ID non-calling empids....and many that think they can ID some calling empids!

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 19th, 2016, 10:28 pm
by Hans Breuer (twoton)
Very nice :-)

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 20th, 2016, 4:57 pm
by Jeff
Sweet mother of mercy, Brian, it's true, you've turned twitcher. You weren't lying. Next time I see you, it'll be a tweed jacket and a fake British accent.

"Snakes crawl forth twixt briar and trail
For mad herpetologist thy search doth fail"

Jeff

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 20th, 2016, 9:51 pm
by Brian Hubbs
This is what the DNA bullshit with herps does to people...they go after a new hobby... :lol:

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 24th, 2016, 9:23 am
by chrish
Jeff wrote:Sweet mother of mercy, Brian, it's true, you've turned twitcher. You weren't lying. Next time I see you, it'll be a tweed jacket and a fake British accent.
Real birders don't wear tweed. They wear loose fitting kakhi pants, long sleeve kakhi shirts over a bird-themed T-shirt, a khaki photographer's vest and a kakhi floppy wide-brimmed hat.

Actually, we herpers could learn something from them. Having done it both ways, I can assure you that after 12 hours in the field in the tropics you are much more comfortable dressed like a birder than a herper (flip flops, shorts, t-shirt) or a hiker (shorts, hiking boots, long sleeves).

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 24th, 2016, 7:32 pm
by Hans Breuer (twoton)
Real birders don't wear tweed. They wear loose fitting kakhi pants, long sleeve kakhi shirts over a bird-themed T-shirt, a khaki photographer's vest and a kakhi floppy wide-brimmed hat.
Khaki, in the forest?? I spend a fortune on cammo clothes, and I wish they made Ghillie suits my size :-(

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 24th, 2016, 8:21 pm
by chrish
Khaki won't get you in trouble like Camo can.

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 24th, 2016, 8:38 pm
by Hans Breuer (twoton)
Like, in heavily contested border areas?

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 28th, 2016, 3:43 am
by chrish
Hans Breuer (twoton) wrote:Like, in heavily contested border areas?
Yes, or places with military "issues" like oppressive military regimes and general distrust of the government or places with potential instability from putative insurgent factions.

Indonesia used to be this way back in the early 80s. Military looking gear wasn't a way to make friends in some areas.

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 28th, 2016, 9:21 pm
by Curtis Hart
Camo is completely banned where I volunteer on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. They are afraid of someone taking the island.

Re: Identifying empid flycatchers...

Posted: July 29th, 2016, 6:12 am
by Hans Breuer (twoton)
Thanks for the warnings, guys!