It is currently June 26th, 2017, 7:43 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Losing a species on your lifelist?
PostPosted: August 12th, 2016, 9:04 am 
User avatar

Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:14 pm
Posts: 3296
Location: San Antonio, TX
As I complained recently, my lifelist jumped from 1998 to 2002 birds recently (actually today on Ebird) due to some recent taxonomic changes.

But now it looks like many of us will be losing a bird. Recently published research shows that Blue-winged and Golden-winged Warblers are just color morphs of the same species of bird. I assume they will be lumped in an npcoming AOU checklist?

Although I complained earlier about getting my 2K bird through a split, I noticed that it makes this velociraptor sighting my 2000th bird, which if I have to have a 2K bird, this ain't a bad one!

Image


Top
 Profile WWW 
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Losing a species on your lifelist?
PostPosted: August 12th, 2016, 12:48 pm 
User avatar

Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:41 am
Posts: 4655
Location: "Buy My Books"-land
Oh, that's so sad that you might lose a bird...I feel your pain... :lol:
Did you see my Tern I posted for you?


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Losing a species on your lifelist?
PostPosted: August 16th, 2016, 5:19 pm 
User avatar

Joined: March 16th, 2011, 11:28 am
Posts: 547
Location: New Jersey
So they're taking away Golden-winged, but they want us to separate 13 species of Red Crossbills by looking at sonograms of their stupid flight calls? AOU can bite me.

I'm going to form an Amish-style utopian society, except instead of freezing technology in the 18th century, I'm going to freeze taxonomy in the 1980's.


Top
 Profile WWW 
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Losing a species on your lifelist?
PostPosted: August 17th, 2016, 10:05 am 
User avatar

Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:41 am
Posts: 4655
Location: "Buy My Books"-land
:lol: :lol: :lol:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Losing a species on your lifelist?
PostPosted: August 22nd, 2016, 11:49 am 
User avatar

Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:14 pm
Posts: 3296
Location: San Antonio, TX
cbernz wrote:
So they're taking away Golden-winged, but they want us to separate 13 species of Red Crossbills by looking at sonograms of their stupid flight calls? AOU can bite me.

I'm going to form an Amish-style utopian society, except instead of freezing technology in the 18th century, I'm going to freeze taxonomy in the 1980's.


You might have to dial back a bit further. I think the Crossbill split was published in the 1980s.


Top
 Profile WWW 
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Losing a species on your lifelist?
PostPosted: August 22nd, 2016, 11:53 am 
User avatar

Joined: March 16th, 2011, 11:28 am
Posts: 547
Location: New Jersey
chrish wrote:
cbernz wrote:
So they're taking away Golden-winged, but they want us to separate 13 species of Red Crossbills by looking at sonograms of their stupid flight calls? AOU can bite me.

I'm going to form an Amish-style utopian society, except instead of freezing technology in the 18th century, I'm going to freeze taxonomy in the 1980's.


You might have to dial back a bit further. I think the Crossbill split was published in the 1980s.


Really? It was always one species in all my field guides. I thought the Crossbill split hasn't actually been accepted yet.


Top
 Profile WWW 
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Losing a species on your lifelist?
PostPosted: August 25th, 2016, 2:46 pm 
User avatar

Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:14 pm
Posts: 3296
Location: San Antonio, TX
cbernz wrote:
chrish wrote:
cbernz wrote:
So they're taking away Golden-winged, but they want us to separate 13 species of Red Crossbills by looking at sonograms of their stupid flight calls? AOU can bite me.

I'm going to form an Amish-style utopian society, except instead of freezing technology in the 18th century, I'm going to freeze taxonomy in the 1980's.


You might have to dial back a bit further. I think the Crossbill split was published in the 1980s.


Really? It was always one species in all my field guides. I thought the Crossbill split hasn't actually been accepted yet.


The initial studies showing that there were possibly 7 (?) species of Red Crossbill go back to then. Now, subsequent research has described as many as 10 North American species and 20 European Species of "Red Crossbill". Most sources haven't accepted these new species mostly because they are so hard to define.

Of course, I may have two new birds on the horizon anyway - http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=b35 ... 7966fa68f5
I've seen three of the four (Myrtle, Audubons, and Black-fronted) so that will be two new ones hopefully. Just a question of if/when it is accepted into the field guides.

Chris


Top
 Profile WWW 
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: