Rana draytonii in Nevada

Dedicated exclusively to field herping.

Moderator: Scott Waters

Post Reply
User avatar
FunkyRes
Posts: 1994
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 5:19 am
Location: Redding, CA
Contact:

Rana draytonii in Nevada

Post by FunkyRes » March 12th, 2013, 8:31 am

There are some references to historic introduced populations of Rana draytonii in Nevada that are apparently difficult to get at to access their current status, or at least that is what just about every paper that references them says.

When was the last time they were verified? Are they still there or did they die out? Anyone know?

User avatar
Sam Bacchini
Posts: 379
Joined: March 1st, 2011, 10:26 am
Location: NorCal

Re: Rana draytonii in Nevada

Post by Sam Bacchini » March 12th, 2013, 11:03 am

I've heard of this population, but not anything current.

User avatar
Fieldnotes
Posts: 1471
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 5:12 pm
Location: Orange County, CA
Contact:

Re: Rana draytonii in Nevada

Post by Fieldnotes » March 12th, 2013, 11:08 am

My thoughts are, if they followed the fate of introductions elsewhere then they are likely gone.

User avatar
FunkyRes
Posts: 1994
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 5:19 am
Location: Redding, CA
Contact:

Re: Rana draytonii in Nevada

Post by FunkyRes » March 12th, 2013, 9:22 pm

Yeah, I thought they *might* potentially make a decent source for genetic diversity in re-introduction attempts in former CA habitat. If they survived. Baja specimens might make a good source for SoCal re-introduction. But I thought maybe the Nevada stock might be good for the struggling Sierra populations.

User avatar
Bryan Hamilton
Posts: 1217
Joined: June 10th, 2010, 8:49 pm

Re: Rana draytonii in Nevada

Post by Bryan Hamilton » March 13th, 2013, 11:56 am

Have you tried contacting any biologists with NDOW?

PM me and I can get you their contact information.

Jackson Shedd
Posts: 147
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 4:48 pm

Re: Rana draytonii in Nevada

Post by Jackson Shedd » March 13th, 2013, 2:10 pm

I've wondered about this as well. As for reintroducing R. draytonii to SoCal using Baja stock, this is currently being investigated.

Bryan, pm coming at you...

Robert Hansen
Posts: 172
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:35 pm

Re: Rana draytonii in Nevada

Post by Robert Hansen » March 13th, 2013, 7:31 pm

Image

Rana draytonii was introduced to multiple localities in Nevada in the 1930s, with stock apparently derived from SF Bay Area populations. This fact was somehow overlooked much later, when a manuscript was developed (but never published) to describe these frogs as a new species ("Rana antiqua"), based on material from Duckwater, Nye Co. In 1984 I visited two sites in Nye Co. and found the frogs to be common. Subsequently, David Green looked at allozymes of these frogs and confirmed their identity as draytonii. I don't know their current status, but the most recent publication (Reaser 2003. Occurrence of the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) in Nevada, USA. Western North American Naturalist 63(3):400-401) suggests that frogs persist at some localities. PM me or email ([email protected]) if you want a pdf of the Reaser pub.

User avatar
Bryan Hamilton
Posts: 1217
Joined: June 10th, 2010, 8:49 pm

Re: Rana draytonii in Nevada

Post by Bryan Hamilton » March 15th, 2013, 6:44 am

Bob. is. the. man.

User avatar
Sam Bacchini
Posts: 379
Joined: March 1st, 2011, 10:26 am
Location: NorCal

Re: Rana draytonii in Nevada

Post by Sam Bacchini » March 16th, 2013, 9:29 am

Robert Hansen wrote:Rana draytonii was introduced to multiple localities in Nevada in the 1930s, with stock apparently derived from SF Bay Area populations. This fact was somehow overlooked much later, when a manuscript was developed (but never published) to describe these frogs as a new species ("Rana antiqua"), based on material from Duckwater, Nye Co. In 1984 I visited two sites in Nye Co. and found the frogs to be common. Subsequently, David Green looked at allozymes of these frogs and confirmed their identity as draytonii. I don't know their current status, but the most recent publication (Reaser 2003. Occurrence of the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) in Nevada, USA. Western North American Naturalist 63(3):400-401) suggests that frogs persist at some localities. PM me or email ([email protected]) if you want a pdf of the Reaser pub.
Glad to hear. I figured that was likely the case.

Post Reply