Catching the spring migrations

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BDSkinner
Posts: 231
Joined: February 15th, 2011, 8:03 am
Location: Boone, NC

Catching the spring migrations

Post by BDSkinner »

I have been going to this site four years now and it has never disappointed. It is a small plot of land owned by our local Audubon Society and mainly used for birding, but it is perfect for spotted salamanders. It started with a project I did and has continued to look at other things as well. The past two year we have been photographing and taking measurements on A. maculatum. I'm a bit fuzzy on the details (been out of the loop since graduating), but my friend and a professor are looking into spot color/ characteristics as it relates to body condition. This year we continued that and also swabbed for chytrid.

I love witnessing this event. Not only is this the first big herp outing I do every year, but to see a ton of these guys after a long spell of nothing in winter really gets me excited. No matter how many years I'm around for it, migrating A. maculatum will never lose its edge.

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Cold, wet, collecting data. Can't get any better than that.

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I only photographed one A. maculatum.... Saw about 80....

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Second year in a row seeing a Pseudotriton montanus during the migration. There were two all night, this one and one that showed up later, DOR.

This area lays next to a small farm. Even though it doesn't get much traffic on the road, the ones who drive it have huge trucks. We finally came up with the idea to put a sign up this time of year to at least let them know what is going on. If they listen, well thats another story.

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A Notophthalamus viridescens crossing the road. A first time for me to see an adult walking around and well away from the ponds. I love his stance.

Also seen were tons of peepers, one pickrel frog, a few good wood frogs and their egg masses, and a lone Desmognathus fuscus. No toads this year.

The number of A. maculatum was much less that last year, so next rain we get should bring the rest of them out. We checked the ponds which turned out to be clear of any spotted eggs. The next week or so should still bring in some excitement!


-Brad

corey.raimond
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Joined: July 20th, 2010, 8:43 pm

Re: Catching the spring migrations

Post by corey.raimond »

Cool salamanders! Thanks for sharing.

-Corey

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Carl Brune
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:22 am
Location: Athens, OH
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Re: Catching the spring migrations

Post by Carl Brune »

Pretty awsome that you can find muds out on the road there with some consistency.

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BDSkinner
Posts: 231
Joined: February 15th, 2011, 8:03 am
Location: Boone, NC

Re: Catching the spring migrations

Post by BDSkinner »

Thanks guys!


I have only found Psuedotriton montanus on the road during this time of year. Other than that, I'm knee deep in mud flipping and swinging a dip net erratically to randomly nab one. Our county is right on the line, so they are uncommon all around here. Maybe I'm just not good at finding adults...

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