China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

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Kevin Messenger
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China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by Kevin Messenger »

A link to the previous post, #50, HK with Noel: http://www.fieldherpforum.com/forum/vie ... =2&t=15782

This will be the last post from the 2012 trip. Initially I thought this was going to be fairly short, since it’s only about 4 days’ worth of herping, but upon completion, doesn’t seem like it. Lots of pics, as usual.


21 September 2012
Anne and I left for Thailand today, Noel flew back to Singapore as well. The flight over was only about $300, round trip.

Bangkok airport:
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Quite hot and humid. It really got my blood pumping.

We met up with Ray at the Bangkok airport. He had been in Thailand for about a week already. Just a reminder, Ray was the young herper that showed Anne and I the place where Opisthotropis balteata lives, which is also the place that is populated by a single individual.

At the airport we had a frozen coconut, which costs around 9 bhat:
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The research station we were going to is a place Anne is familiar with. She spent some time there a few years ago and has talked about it a lot. The director of the research station, Taksin (possibly spelled wrong, but phonetically correct), picked us up. The ride to the research station, Sakaerat Environmental Research Station, took about 3 hours. On the ride up we stopped to pick up about 30 coconuts (at a street vendor like this, the coconuts go for about 1 bhat each):

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Our ride to the station:
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At the research station we met up with Mary-Ruth, who I hadn’t seen since late July in Hong Kong, around the time of the King cobra sighting (see post #46: http://www.fieldherpforum.com/forum/vie ... =2&t=13833)

The station itself was amazing. The station and the setup was like an advanced field station in Shennongjia. In Shennongjia, the field stations are among a village, here, the entire research station was out there by itself. They had several cooks dedicated and the dining room was kind of like a cafeteria. In order to save on glasses they cut the tops out of aluminum coke cans and those were the “glasses” you drank out of.

I am really envious of Taksin, being in charge of such a cool place. We arrived close to sunset, just in time for dinner.

One of Anne’s goals was to meet up with an old friend of hers, Sheila, a Taiwanese researcher studying Chiromantis breeding – she had 3 researcher techs from California, so we got to meet all of them as well – Joe, John, and Adair.

The station also had another American herp researcher, Colin, who was doing telemetry work with Trimeresurus macrops – this was the other part of Anne’s goal, to meet up with Colin and for the two of them to talk, since Anne’s work was quite similar. But Colin wasn’t there that night.

We dropped our gear off in our cabin (a two story cabin, Mary-Ruth and Anne on the second floor, Ray and I on the first floor). The living room of the cabin:
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The bedroom Ray and I shared:
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The living conditions were way higher than I was expecting. The only complaint some people may have is the massive amounts of ants that freely made their way through the building. There is no stopping them, so the best thing to do is just learn to live with them. They don’t bite, so no real issue.

Outside our cabin on the walls were tons of Tokay geckos (Gekko gecko):
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And Asian flat-tailed geckos ( Cosymbotus platyurus):
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After dropping our gear off, we headed to the mess hall for dinner.
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The station had a number of grad students from all over the world:
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Several from Thailand of course, Japan, Taiwan, the US. It was a great atmosphere, the part of academia I really enjoy.

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Dragon fruit:
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Chang beer; I was actually quite impressed with this beer. But it might have just been because I have been in Asia for so long, but I thought it was very pleasant. I later picked up a bottle in the US, and it was horrible. But I’ve come to realize you can’t judge the quality of a beer that has to travel a long distance from the brewery to final destination.
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Just outside of the mess hall is a little porch patio where everyone goes to hang out, drink some more, and mess around on the internet. It’s the best location for the wi-fi (something none of my Chinese field stations have ever had….)

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(Joe on the left, Jonathon opposite of Joe, Anne to Jon’s left, and Mary-Ruth behind them)

Just beyond the patio was a little man-made pond that was loaded with a couple of frog species, mostly Hylarana nigrovittata and Limnonectes megostomalis:
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Some audio of their calls:


After dinner, John, Joe, and Adair took us up to the top of the paved road where they had to count egg masses of Chiromantis. The night reminded me very much of some of the old school research trips I’ve had to various parts of the US (SC, Webb, AZ) – very laid back atmosphere – walking around, looking for frogs, beer in hand, just enjoying life (but working at the same time).

The drive up to the top of the hill:


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I set my beer down for a bit, came back to it, and found this Chiromantis vittatus:
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Adair with a Cyclemys dentata (and a beer. Actually, I don’t think anyone was beerless):
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I spotted a Xenochrophis piscator in the water, but Adair was closer:
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Big-eyed vipers (Trimeresurus macrops) [LIFER] were also close to the waters edge:
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Note the Chiromantis nearby, which the viper was likely waiting for to drop down on the rock below.

Another C. dentata:
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Polypedates leucomystax
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While Adair, Jon, and Joe stayed up at the top of the hill and continued working, we all decided to walk down the road, back to the research station, poking in the woods from time to time. There was a hog wallow that Anne knew of that she wanted to find.

On the walk back, I found a sleeping Rhabdophis s. subminiatus in some vegetation. This was pretty awesome! The red-necks in Hong Kong are the helleri subspecies, this is the nominate subspecies:
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Another T. macrops:
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We found a trail off to the east, and took it down to a stream. On the way down I spotted an awesome snake off in the woods. “krait!”

Bungarus candidus (Blue krait):
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It took forever to get semi-decent shots. These guys love to hide their heads.
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Common palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites) way up in a tree:
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Nasty crop in order to try and get a better view. I don’t bring my 50-500mm sigma with me to Asia. The payoff of carrying it around for the odd mammal shot just isn’t worth it:
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Slender toed geckos (Cyrtodactylus intermedius were commonly found on trees:
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Mary-Ruth spotted this Acanthosaura crucigera:
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We eventually found the hog wallow that Anne was looking for. It was a great spot for frogs.
P. leucomystax
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Microhyla bermorei:
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Chiromantis vittatus:
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Chirixalus nonghkensis:
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We found plenty of T. macrops as well. While searching a small hog wallow, Ray spotted a Rhabdophis nigrocinctus! A species that was very high on my list. I slogged through the water as quickly as I could to try and help catch it, but it escaped before I was even close. Then it resurfaced, but escaped again…

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Obviously in ambush position
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When we got back to the research station, I found some more beer and sat out on the patio, enjoying the sound of the frogs in the nearby pond and the environment I was in

Limnonectes megostomalis
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Hylarana nigrovittata
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Overall it was a good first day, a krait (lifer), R. s. subminiatus (lifer), R. nigrocinctus (lifer), several lifer frogs, a lifer turtle, several lifer lizards, the civet was cool to see as well.


22 September 2012
A view of cabin from the front:
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Our stay, included meals, so I headed over for breakfast.

Another view from our cabin:
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The backyard of our cabin:
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Looking toward the mess hall:
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Daytime view of the research station and the main grounds:
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A view of the front of the station (also the patio where everyone hangs out at night):
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After breakfast, we met Colin. We were going to check his drift fences today. Throughout the reserve, he has about 300 drift fences set up. Only a few open at a time obviously. We checked three that day:

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The only thing that was turned up was a Psammodynastes pulverulentus.

Fast forward to evening.

Pad woonsen (stir fried glass noodles):
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Cha om khai tawt (fried egg with acacia):
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Pla too (mackerel):
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Tom kha gai (thai chicken soup with coconut milk):
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In China, this dish is called “century eggs” – a dish I definitely don’t prefer. In Thailand, the dish is called “khai yiao ma” (horse piss eggs) – a much more apt name in my opinion:
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Awesome salad:
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Ok, so this was another awesome thing about the research station, the way they re-used soda cans:
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They remove the tops, bevel them down smooth so there’s no rough edges and they become the new “glasses” for water, beer, liquor, juice, whatever
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Taksin, Mary-Ruth, Anne, and Ray:
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Taksin breaks out the rum and coconuts:
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After an awesome dinner, we hit the road (walking)
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More T. macrops:
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Calotes emma alticristatus
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Bufo melanostictus
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Then we found a large, impressive female macrops:
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I love the hints of blue around the scale edges
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Leaf litter gecko ( Phyllodactylus siamenensis)
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Cool dorsal scales
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Calotes emma alticristatus
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While walking trails at night, you can sometimes hear “munching” sounds. If you look down, you’ll often see a swath of termites crossing the ground. These guys bite… hard.
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A pissed off Tokay gecko on the road:


Egg mass, most likely Polypedates leucomystax
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Chirixalus nonghkensis:
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Ray, Mary-Ruth, Anne
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23 September 2012
Lunch. Pad thai and grapao gai (basil chicken)
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More dragonfruit, this stuff is good and all, very similar in texture to kiwi, on the inside that is, but way more bland compared to kiwi
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The grounds around the research station are covered with Variable Squirrels (Callosciurus finlaysoni):
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Again, it would have been nice to have my “bigma 50-500” but oh well
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Walking around the grounds, I spotted this little gem from a distance:
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A beautiful, old school CJ 5
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I would love to drive it, but not sure if I could handle doing stick left handed…
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I love how simplistic jeeps are. Computers in vehicles are my nemesis.
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No flash:
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Flash:
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Ray and I took a walk down the main road, the road that goes uphill to the pond that we visited that very first night.
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Some birds in the distance. I think they are called the “crested fire cock” or something like that.
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(a rare species elsewhere, but semi common on the reserve. A lot of Thai researchers/ grad students come to the reserve to see and study them)

Some fungi
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A short rainstorm hit. We waited for it to pass, then kept walking. The next herp was a major thrill to find, an Elongated tortoise (Indotestudo elongate). When we found it, it was chowing down on some scat on the road.
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Another common sight, is ants hauling large centipedes
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We headed back to the station for another awesome dinner, then hit the road again afterward. Someone in the group spotted this Common Slow Loris (Nycticebus coucang) up in a tree.
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Then nearby in a rain barrel, there were some sort of cnidarians or hydra (are there freshwater cnidarians??), or something. It was pretty weird to see in a rain barrel.
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Calotes emma alticristatus
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Horrible posed shot. Damn guy wouldn’t be cooperative
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Tokay:
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Forest scorpion in burrow:
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It took a lot to coax him out. Pretty big species, about the same size as an emperor scorpion, but a weird dark green coloration, which obviously didn’t turn out in the shots
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We headed back to the hog wallow where the Rhabdophis nigrocinctus escaped two nights prior.

Chirixalus nonghkensis
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Then I saw my target, a sleeping R. nigrocinctus:
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Trying to elicit some nuchal behaviors:
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I eventually got some very slight posturing:
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Chirixalus vittatus
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Microhyla berdmorei
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Cool “bird-dropping” spider:
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We headed back to the station. Anne spotted an Ahaetulla prasina in a tree:
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Ray with the snake
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Kaloula pulchra
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Hylarana nigrovittata
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24 September 2012 – Thailand; nigrocinctus escaped, Theloderma, 5 macrops (I was photographing the captives)

The last full day of herping, tomorrow morning we would be leaving. Time goes so quickly. Four days of herping this site just isn’t enough, and the first day we didn’t even arrive until nightfall… This place is definitely a place I need to come back to. Colin is eager to have me back. We talked about the luck I had in Hong Kong with the king cobra. Taksin really wants me to find a king while I’m here. I tried to explain how extremely lucky it was. A few nights ago, Colin was showing me pics of a baby king he found that was moving through the main station grounds. So jealous!

Anyway, I did some solo hiking today after breakfast. Another major species I’d love to find on my last day would be a retic. Colin turns them up somewhat on a regular basis. He told me about a 4 m retic he caught not too long ago while checking traps. Burms also live in the area as well. In all, the station has recorded 90 species of reptiles (2 turtles, 34 lizards, 54 snakes)

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Since tonight was our last night, Taksin wanted to have a special dinner. That night we had horseshoe crab eggs:
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It was quite fishy tasting, and definitely something I didn’t care for.

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Apparently, in some parts of Asia, horseshoe crab is considered a delicacy and some populations of horseshoe crabs are quite threatened. Luckily that wasn’t the case where we were. However, on that note, perhaps my one complaint about the station was their constant attempts to serve me herps. The first night we were there, they were serving bullfrog. Then the next night they had softshell turtle, and another night they were serving crocodile! Man, I had to keep asking “what’s this meat” to make sure it wasn’t a herp. This was rarely a problem in China. Actually, only once, in 2006, was a herp served as part of a meal.

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That night didn’t yield too much except for the typical animals (T. macrops). We had a lot of captives by now that I needed to catch up on photos.

Sibynophis collaris
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The Rhabdophis s. subminiatus from that first night. It was opaque at the time, I had been waiting for it to shed.
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The scalation on the nape of the neck definitely seems different from the HK animals. In the HK animals you can almost see the glands based on the scalation (two distinct rows of scales, under which are the glands).

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Oligodon cinereus
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While we were photographing some of the animals, outside our cabin, someone spotted this gem just a few feet from our front door. When Anne saw it she was blown away, she was thinking we would have gone deep into the forest to turn one up.

Theloderma stellatum
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These guys are harder to photograph than I thought. Their rugulosa body makes it look like the pic is out of focus when it might not be. Weird, messes with the eyes.

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25 September 2012 – leave Thailand, fly back to HK
We were to leave this morning after breakfast. I wanted to climb the canopy tower (~150m I believe), get some shots of sunrise. It didn’t really work out, but these are the shots I got:
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Ray and Mary-Ruth down below:
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After breakfast, we loaded up in the taxi and headed for the airport. The station will be sorely missed. It is one of the best research stations I’ve been to. For the 4 nights, and the 3 meals per day, the total cost came to $45 USD.

26 September 2012
Back in Hong Kong. Catch up day. Just writing notes, downloading pics, answering emails, etc etc. I only had a couple days before heading back to the states. One more night of herping, and then my final night is gonna be a food night with Dan and Kevin.

Colin from Thailand sent me an email with a photo. Apparently yesterday, the day we left, later that evening a Naja kaouthia slithered through the main grounds! Ugh… dammit.

27 September 2012
It was just Kevin and I tonight. We hiked Shek Kong. We found a DOR multicinctus, and 4 T. albolabris, one of which was incredibly yellow, looking quite similar to something akin to an Asian Bothriechis.

Since it was my last Asian herp of 2012, I took a lot of pics.

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I crashed at Dan’s for the night.

28 September 2012
My last complete day in HK. Dan was in China the day before, and got in late. He left a note saying he left a gift in the fridge. I opened the fridge to reveal this golden glory:
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I can see the light! I don’t think I have mentioned this. Last year, Mtn Dew was plentiful in HK, but this year, it was almost nonexistent…. It was killing me. So when Dan was in China, he saw some Mtn Dew and was kind enough to grab me 4 bottles as a going away present. Awesome.

Kevin knew of a fish region of HK that he suggested I try. I mentioned earlier in my trip that I tend to dislike seafood, but that I love sushi, and every time I’m in the Keys, I tend to love the seafood down there. Kevin mentioned it was probably an issue with freshness, and then talked about this one section of HK that was known for seafood.

The night consisted of me, Dan, Kevin, and most of his family (wife, mother-in-law, one kid). The food was indeed very awesome, and there wasn’t a single course that I disliked.

We arrived at the fish market, to no surprise, there was a nearby cat. What was surprising was it’s playfulness

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A bunch of mantis shrimp
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Big clams
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Mantis shrimp
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A good import:
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Crabs:
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Clams and glass noodles:
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Grouper:
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Mantis shrimp (which is awesome):
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29 September 2012
Woke up, got my bags, jumped on a bus, and headed for the airport. It’s been a long ride (about 4.5 months’ worth).

Species list (for the entire trip):
Herps of China 2012
Sci name/ common name if available (location where the first specimen of that species was found)

1. Azemiops feae/ Fea’s viper (ShenNongJia)
2. Bungarus candidus/ Blue krait (Thailand)
3. Bungarus multicinctus/ Many-banded krait (Hainan)
4. Gloydius brevicaudus/ Mamushi (Beijing)
5. Naja atra/ Chinese cobra (Hainan)
6. Ophiophagus hannah/ King cobra (Hong Kong)
7. Ovophis monticola makazayazaya/ Mountain pit-viper (Taiwan)
8. Protobothrops jerdonii/ Jerdon’s pit-viper (ShenNongJia)
9. Protobothrops mucrosquamata/ Habu (Taiwan)
10. Sinomicrurus kelloggii/ Kellogg’s Chinese coral snake (Hainan)
11. Sinomicrurus m. macclellandi/ MacClelland’s Chinese coral snake (Hainan)
12. Sinomicrurus macclellandi swinhoei/ Taiwan MacClelland’s coral snake (Taiwan)
13. Trimeresurus albolabris/ Bamboo pit-viper (Hainan)
14. Trimeresurus macrops/ Large eyed tree viper (Thailand)
15. Trimeresurus s. stejnegeri/ Green tree viper (Taiwan)

16. Achalinus rufescens/ Rufous burrowing snake (Hainan)
17. Achalinus spinalis/ Chinese burrowing snake (ShenNongJia)
18. Ahaetulla prasina/ Oriental vine snake (Thailand)
19. Amphiesma boulengeri/ White-browed keelback (Hainan)
20. Amphiesma sauteri/ Sauter’s keelback (Taiwan)
21. Amphiesma stolata/ Buff-striped keelback (Hainan)
22. Boiga kraepelini (Taiwan)
23. Boiga multomaculata/ Large-spotted cat snake (Hainan)
24. Coelognathus radiatus/ Radiated ratsnake (Hong Kong)
25. Coluber spinalis/ Striped racer (Beijing)
26. Cyclophiops major/ Greater green snake (Taiwan)
27. Dinodon rufozonatum/ Red banded snake (ShenNongJia)
28. Dinodon rosozonatum/ Pink banded snake (Hainan)
29. Elaphe carinata/ King ratsnake (ShenNongJia)
30. Elaphe dione/ Dione’s ratsnake (Beijing)
31. Elaphe taeniura friesi/ Taiwan beauty snake (Taiwan)
32. Elaphe taeniura mccordi/ McCord’s Beauty snake (ShenNongJia)
33. Enhydris plumbea/ Plumbeous water snake (Hainan)
34. Lycodon aulicus/ Common wolf snake (Hong Kong)
35. Lycodon futsingensis (Hong Kong)
36. Lycodon liuchengchaoi/ Liu’s wolf snake (ShenNongJia)
37. Lycodon r. ruhstrati/ Mountain wolf snake (Taiwan)
38. Oligodon formosanus/ Taiwan kukri snake (Hainan)
39. Oligodon ningshaanensis/ NingShan kukri snake (ShenNongJia)
40. Opisthotropis kuatunensis/ Striped stream snake (Hong Kong)
41. Opisthotropis lateralis/ Bi-colored stream snake (Hong Kong)
42. Pareas margaritophorus/ White-spotted slug eater (Hainan)
43. Psammodynastes pulverulentus/ Mock viper (Hainan)
44. Pseudoxenodon macrops/ False cobra (ShenNongJia)
45. Ptyas korros/ Indo-Chinese ratsnake (Hainan)
46. Ptyas mucosus/ Common ratsnake (Hong Kong)
47. Python molurus bivittatus/ Burmese python (Hong Kong)
48. Rhabdophis nigrocinctus/ Green neck keelback (Thailand)
49. Rhabdophis nuchalis/ Groove-neck keelback (ShenNongJia)
50. Rhabdophis subminiatus helleri/ Heller’s Redneck keelback (Hainan)
51. Rhabdophis s. subminiatus/ Redneck keelback (Thailand)
52. Rhamphotyphlops braminus/ Blind snake (Hong Kong)
53. Rhynchophis boulengeri/ Rhino ratsnake (Hainan)
54. Sibynophis c. chinensis/ Chinese mountain snake (ShenNongJia)
55. Sinonatrix p. percarinata/ Mountain water snake (Hainan)
56. Sinonatrix p. suriki/ Taiwan mountain water snake (Taiwan)
57. Xenochrophis piscator/ Checkered keelback (Hainan)
58. Xenopeltis hainanensis/ Hainan sunbeam snake (Hainan)
59. Zaocys dhumnades oshimai/ Big-eyed racer (Taiwan)

60. Acanthosaura lepidogaster/ (Hainan)
61. Acanthosaura crucigera (Thailand)
62. Ateuchosaurus chinensis/ Short-legged forest skink (Hong Kong)
63. Calotes emma alticristatus (Thailand)
64. Calotes versicolor/ Changeable lizard (Hainan)
65. Cosymbotus platyurus/ Flat-tailed gecko (Thailand)
66. Cyrtodactylus intermedius/ Slender toed gecko (Thailand)
67. Ermias argus (Beijing)
68. Eumeces capito/ Five-lined skink (Beijing)
69. Eumeces elegans/ Elegant Five-lined skink (ShenNongJia)
70. Gekko chinensis/ Chinese gecko (Hainan)
71. Gekko gecko/ Tokay gecko (Hong Kong)
72. Goniurosaurus hainanensis/ Hainan gecko (Hainan)
73. Hemidactylus frenatus/ common house gecko (Hainan)
74. Hemidactylus bowringii (Hong Kong)
75. Japalura polygonata xanthostoma/ Yellow-throated japalura (Taiwan)
76. Mabuya longicauda/ Long-tailed skink (Hong Kong)
77. Mabuya multifasciata/ Sun grazer (Hainan)
78. Phyllodactylus siamenensis/ (Thailand)
79. Physignathus cocincinus/ Chinese water dragon (Hong Kong)
80. Platyplacopus kuehnei (Hainan)
81. Sphenomorphus indicus (ShenNongJia)
82. Tropidophorus hainanensis/ Hainan water skink (Hainan)
83. Tropidophorus sinensis/ Chinese water skink (Hong Kong)

84. Amolops chunganensis (ShenNongJia)
85. Amolops hainanensis/ Hainan torrent frog (Hainan)
86. Amolops hongkongensis/ Hong Kong torrent frog (Hong Kong)
87. Amolops torrentis (Hainan)
88. Buergeria japonica/ Japanese treefrog (Taiwan)
89. Bufo andrewsi/ Andrew’s toad (ShenNongJia)
90. Bufo bankorensis/ Taiwan toad (Taiwan)
91. Bufo gargarizans/ Chinese toad (ShenNongJia)
92. Bufo melanostictus/ Black spectacled toad (Hainan)
93. Chirixalus doriae (Hainan)
94. Chirixalus nongkhorensis (Thailand)
95. Chiromantis vittatus (Thailand)
96. Fejervarya limnocharis/ Paddy frog (Hainan)
97. Ingerophryne lodongensis (Hainan)
98. Kaloula pulchra hainana / Hainan painted frog (Hainan)
99. Kaloula p. pulchra/ Asian painted frog (Hong Kong)
100. Kalophrynus interlineatus/ Spotted narrowmouth frog (Hainan)
101. Kurixalus bisacculus (Hainan)
102. Limnonectes kuhlii/ Big-headed frog (Taiwan)
103. Limnonectes megostomalis (Thailand)
104. Microhyla berdmorei (Thailand)
105. Microhyla heymonsi/ Heymon’s narrowmouth (Hainan)
106. Microhyla butleri/ Butler’s narrowmouth (Hainan)
107. Microhyla ornata/ Ornate narrowmouth (Hainan)
108. Microhyla pulchra/ Beautiful narrowmouth (Hainan)
109. Occidozyga martensii (Hainan)
110. Odorrana margaratae/ Odorous Frog (ShenNongJia)
111. Odorrana swinhoana (Taiwan)
112. Philautus ocellatus (Hainan)
113. Philautus romeri/ Romer’s treefrog (Hong Kong)
114. Polypedates megacephalum/ Brown treefrog (Hainan)
115. Polypedates mutus (Hainan)
116. Polypedates leucomystax (Thailand)
117. Rana adenopleura (Taiwan)
118. Rana catesbiana/ American bullfrog (Hong Kong)
119. Rana [Hylarana] chloronota/ Green cascade frog (Hong Kong)
120. Rana [Paa] fragilis (Hainan)
121. Rana [Paa] exilispinosa/ Lesser spiny frog (Hong Kong)
122. Rana [Hylarana] guentheri/ Gunther’s frog (Hainan)
123. Rana [Paa] kuhlii/ Big-headed frog (Taiwan)
124. Rana latouchii/ Brown wood frog (Hong Kong)
125. Rana nigromaculata/ black spotted frog (ShenNongJia)
126. Rana [Hylarana] nigrovittata/ black striped frog (Thailand)
127. Rana rugulosa/ Chinese bullfrog (Hainan)
128. Rana spinulosa (Hainan)
129. Rana swinhoana/ Swinhoe’s frog (Taiwan)
130. Rana taipehensis/ Two striped grass frog (Hainan)
131. Rana versabilis (Hainan)
132. Rhacophorus rhodopus (Hainan)
133. Theloderma stellatum/ mossy frog (Thailand)
134. Xenophrys brachykolos/ Short-legged toad (Hong Kong)

135. Liua shihi/ Wushang salamander (ShenNongJia)
136. Paramesotriton hongkongensis/ Hong Kong newt (Hong Kong)
137. Ranodon tsinpaensis (ShenNongJia)
138. Tylototriton hainanensis/ Hainan newt (Hainan)

139. Cyclemys dentata/ Asian leaf turtle (Thailand)
140. Indotestudo elongata/ Elongated tortoise (Thailand)
141. Ocadia sinensis (Hainan)
142. Trachemys scripta (Nanjing)

Congrats to anyone that was able to read all of the 2012 stuff!

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Badgerberling
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Re: China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by Badgerberling »

http://www.fieldherpforum.com/forum/pos ... =2&t=15818#

Thanks for the wonderful post from a part of the world many of us will never see. I really enjoyed the habitat shots.

Awesome post.

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Ruxs
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Re: China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by Ruxs »

Glad you commented on the mundanity of Dragonfruit. By it's name and the way it looks, you would expect a strong taste.

Great finds. Nakhon Ratchasima is a real hotspot for reptiles.

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mrichardson
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Re: China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by mrichardson »

Thanks for taking the time to post this! Just when I thought it couldn't get any better you throw in the Jeep! I also enjoyed all the habitat/food/people shots. Great work!

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Antonsrkn
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Re: China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by Antonsrkn »

As always a really interesting and enjoyable post to look and read through, thanks for putting it together. Incredible finds, based on what I have seen in your posts Trimeresurus sp. seem to be a common find but I just can't enough of them, such beautiful and badass snakes! Also congrats on not 1 but 2 species of chelonians!
That night we had horseshoe crab eggs
Interesting, I thought only birds ate those.

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Kevin Messenger
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Re: China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by Kevin Messenger »

Antonsrkn wrote:
That night we had horseshoe crab eggs
Interesting, I thought only birds ate those.
And they should be left for only the birds! Definitely not very good. Very salty...

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RenoBart
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Re: China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by RenoBart »

Awesome post, love the herps and the food/travel pics. Very jealous.

Bart

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Roki
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Re: China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by Roki »

Great post on Thailand and SE Asia. Makes me miss that place even more.
Roki

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JakeScott
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Re: China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by JakeScott »

Damn! I could just leave it at that...

So much good stuff I don't even know where to begin. The Indotestudo elongate is definitely a cool thing to see. And you got to see Quagmire in the flesh; Dan Rosenberg.

-Jake Scott

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todd battey
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Re: China post #51, Thailand and final days in HK

Post by todd battey »

Amazing variety of incredible animals.

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