Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

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Mike Pingleton
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Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Mike Pingleton » January 1st, 2014, 12:11 pm

How did my field herping in 2013 stack up? I’ll put it in the Not Bad category. Time is at a premium, so it all goes in the mixer and out comes this single Hot Stove post, from pole to pole, from start to finish. We’ll start at the equator.
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The easy way to herp year ‘round is to go somewhere warm when the cold wind blows. In early January I went back to the Peruvian Amazon with MT Amazon Expeditions, and saw close to 130 different forms, including 40 that were new to me. It was a very good trip for amphibians. Here is a Two Striped Treefrog, Scinax ruber:
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Red-Striped Treefrog, Dendropsophus rhodopepla, calling over a small pond:
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One of the most common frogs seen in the forest was the Pale-Striped Poison Frog, Ameerega hahneli:
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Ranitomeya duellmani:
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Ranitomeya ventrimaculata:
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Amazon Sheep Frog, Hamptophryne boliviana. These cool microhylids are related to the Narrowmouth Toads found back home in the States.
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Painted Antnest Frog (Lithodytes lineatus):
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Golden-Eyed Milk Frog, Trachycephalus resinifictrix. A few of these turned up - they are tree-dwellers, and their call is a distinctive nasal 'wurk, wurk wurk':
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The seldom-seen Tracycephalus coriaceae:
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Map Treefrog (Hypsiboas geographicus) Favorite frog ever? Maybe. I love 'em.
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This blue-phase Crested Toad (Rhinella margaritifera complex) was a knockout:
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Goblin Toad (Rhinella margaritifera complex):
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A Sharp-Nosed Toad, Rhinella dapsilis:
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The lovely Harlequin Toad (Atelopus spumarius), in situ in the forest:
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Convict Treefrog, Hypsiboas calcarata:
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The bromeliad frogs are beautiful and sometimes difficult to identify. This is the Flat-Headed Bromeliad Frog (Osteocephalus planiceps):
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Marti's Rain Frog, Pristimantis martiae.
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Pristimantis padiali was just described in 2010:
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The Variable Clown Treefrog (Dendropsophus triangulum) lived up to its name. It is difficult to find two that look exactly alike:
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We killed it on the phyllomedusines. Here's the Tiger Leg Monkey Frog, Phyllomedusa tomopterna:
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Seeing and photographing the Giant Monkey Frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor) was a big moment for me:
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White-Lined Monkey Frog (Phyllomedusa vaillanti):
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Aquatic Caecilian (Typhlonectes compressicauda):
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Amazon Climbing Salamander (Bolitoglossa altamazonica):
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and then there was this little guy - Amazon River Turtle (Podocnemis sextuberculatus):
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Lizards? Why, yes! Bridled Forest Gecko, Gonatodes humeralis (male):
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This is a young Amazon Forest Dragon (Enyalioides laticeps). Adult males are bright green.
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Banded Tree Anole (Anolis transversalis).
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A juvenile Golden Tegu (Tupinambis teguixin):
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Jake with the Caiman Lizard (Dracaena guianensis) that wandered into the field station one day. The raised scales on the tail are as sharp as chainsaw teeth.
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Dracaena guianensis close up.
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Common Monkey Lizard, Polychrus marmoratus:
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John Sullivan and I went kayaking one day on the Rio Orosa, and John spotted this guy in the thicket along the bank - Crocodile Tegu (Crocodilurus amazonicus).
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We saw plenty of cool snakes, many of which are featured in an upcoming issue of Herp Nation Magazine. Here are a few to wet your whistle:
Aquatic Coral Snake (Micrurus surinamensis surinamensis):
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Commonly seen but hellaciously cool - Blunt-Headed Tree Snake (Imantodes cenchoa):
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Glossy Forest Racer, Drymoluber dichrous:
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White-Naped Earth Snake (Atractus snethlageae)
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Gotta watch your step - juvenile Fer de Lance (Bothrops atrox) are common:
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Finding my first wild Bushmaster was the top-tier find of the year for me:
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It was going to be difficult to top that snake, even with 11 months of the year left to go.

After getting back home I spent the next month or so processing pictures and waiting for a break in the weather. When spring came I made a number of trips around the Midwest, visiting with old familiar friends. They may not be sexy and exotic, but they are reliable as the mail, and interesting in their own right.
Shawnee Moccasin (Agkistrodon piscivorus leucostoma):
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Leopard Frog tadpoles:
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Ornate Box Turtle:
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Western Hognose:
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Clonophis kirtlandi:
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Eastern Box Turtle:
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I got to spend a day helping to survey for Necturus maculosus in Indiana, and had some success. Mudpuppy larvae:
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Adult female Mudpuppy:
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I headed up to Michigan for a couple days in May. Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). LaGrange Co., Indiana.
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Blue Racer (Coluber constrictor foxii) on a chilly morning.
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Butler's Garter Snake (Thamnophis butleri).
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Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus catenatus).
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Tim was happy to get a Sauga (with Nick Scobel and Chris Boguslawski).
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Northern Leopard Frog (Rana pipiens).
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Eastern Fox Snake (Pantherophis gloydi). I was happy to finally see an adult of this species.
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Eastern Hognose Snake (Heterodon platirhinos). I flipped this cutie under tin on a cold day while it was sleeting. You never know.
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After a conference for work, I spent a quick two days herping around Phoenix with Mike and Kris.
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Desert Tortoise (Gopherus morafkai) spotted while walking a wash:
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My first Tiger Rattler (Crotalus tigris). Not sure how I missed seeing these on previous trips, but I was sure glad to finally have one in the can.
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A road-cruised Speckled Rattler (Crotalus mitchelli pyrrhus):
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I went back to Mexico in August, and herped Baja Sur, a place I’ve long been wanting to visit. The herp gods were kind to our group – I’ve never been on a more successful trip.
Cape Gopher Snake, Pituophis vertebralis:
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Mexican Rosy Boa, Lichanura trivirgata trivirgata:
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Baja California Rattlesnake (Crotalus enyo enyo).
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San Lucan Rock Lizard (Petrosaurus thalassinus) along the rocky cliffs at Cabo San Lucas:
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Hunsaker's spiny Lizard (Sceloporus hunsakeri).
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Cape Garter Snake (Thamnophis validus celaeno) from up in the foothills of the Sierra las Lagunas Mountains.
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Baja California Rat Snake (Bogertophis rosaliae). We found one adult, and a handful of neonates.
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The odd-looking Baja California Night Snake, Hypsiglena (formerly Eridiphas) slevini.
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Baja California Brush Lizard (Urosaurus nigricaudus) chillaxing on a twig one night:
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We visited Santa Catalina Island, where many of the herps have ‘catalinensis’ for a specific epithet.
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Santa Catalina Island Desert Iguana (Dipsosaurus catalinensis).
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Santa Catalina Island Rattlesnake (Crotalus catalinensis). We found both the gray and brown color phases of the rattlesnake without a rattle.
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Small, slender, and without a rattle, this pit viper has adapted to climbing in bushes and trees at night in search of sleeping birds.
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Santa Catalina Island Night Snake (Hypsiglena chlorophaea catalinae).
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Santa Catalina Island Chuckwalla (Sauromalus klauberi).
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Santa Catalina Island.
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Baja crew:
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Back on the mainland, our good fortune continued. We saw many San Lucan Speckled Rattlesnakes (Crotalus mitchelli mitchelli).
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San Lucan Diamond Rattlesnake (Crotalus ruber lucasensis). It appears these are now sunk into C. ruber.
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Baja California Collared Lizard (Crotaphytus vestigium).
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Variable Sand Snake (Chilomeniscus stramineus). No two looked alike.
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Peninsular Glossy Snake (Arizona pacata).
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Baja California Lyre Snake (Trimorphodon biscutatus lyrophanes).
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We went to La Paz, and managed to find a Baja California Worm Lizard (Bipes biporus).
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Lampropeltis getula californiae from near La Paz.
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Cape Spiny-Tailed Iguana (Ctenosaura hemilopha) from San Juan del Cabo.
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My last Baja herp was this Green Iguana (Iguana iguana), found close to the ocean at San Juan del Cabo.
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In September, Peter Berg and I made a looooong drive to North Carolina’s Croatan NF for the NAFHA annual meeting, and we found some good herps:
Eastern Ribbon Snake (Thamnophis sauritus sauritus).
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Red-bellied Water Snake (Nerodia erythrogaster erythrogaster) with regurgitated Southern Toad (Bufo terrestris). I washed the bufotoxins and gastric juices off the toad, and it hopped away to live another day.
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Juvenile Greenish Ratsnake (Pantherophis obsoletus).
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Greenish Ratsnake, all grown up.
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We looked and trapped for the elusive Farancia erytrogramma, but came up empty-handed and empty-netted. We did get lots of kinosternids and moccasins in the traps:
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My first Eastern King (Lampropeltis getula getula). Just a few weeks earlier I had been photographing L. getula californiae several thousand miles away in Baja Sur, and it was remarkable to me how similar they were.
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Scarlet Kingsnake (Lampropeltis elapsoides).
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Eastern Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis) found crossing the road at dusk one day.
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Spotted Turtle (Clemmys guttata). Nice looking Spotties there.
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Intergrade Northern / Southern Copperheads (Agkistrodon contortrix).
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Canebrake Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus).
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Carolina Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius miliarius), last herp before we headed for home.
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That’s it! Or, that’s enough, isn’t it? :)

-Mike

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Ribbit » January 1st, 2014, 12:36 pm

Wheeee!! So much goodness. How did 2013 compare with your epic 2011?

John

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by bushmaster W30 » January 1st, 2014, 12:44 pm

I was just sitting here watching the Walking Dead marathon thinking about how much AC there would be to flip if there ever was a Zombie apocalypse(winter sucks) when the thought crossed my mind. Should be about time for a "Hot Stove" Post. Awesome as always. -Thomas

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by peterknuteberg » January 1st, 2014, 1:05 pm

Mike, did you have any time to work or do chores around the house? Awesome year and a Bushmaster to top it off. Definitely some rare species in there too. It was great herping with you as always. Looking forward to more adventures and to reading about Peru in Herp Nation. My Resolution for 2014, like Sean, Herp Better. Peace, Happy New Year!

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Mike Pingleton » January 1st, 2014, 1:06 pm

2013 was a deeper experience. The first few days of my 2011 trip I was in a state of shock. Sensory overload.
-Mike
Ribbit wrote:Wheeee!! So much goodness. How did 2013 compare with your epic 2011?

John

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Mike Pingleton » January 1st, 2014, 1:09 pm

peterknuteberg wrote:Mike, did you have any time to work or do chores around the house? Awesome year and a Bushmaster to top it off. Definitely some rare species in there too. It was great herping with you as always. Looking forward to more adventures and to reading about Peru in Herp Nation. My Resolution for 2014, like Sean, Herp Better. Peace, Happy New Year!
I have neglected some duties around the house, you bet :)
-Mike

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by IllinoisGuy » January 1st, 2014, 1:48 pm

Wow, its incredible how many species you were able to find in Mexico. I have never even heard of many of those species.

Legit stuff as always!

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by justinm » January 1st, 2014, 2:43 pm

Mike,

You never cease to amaze me. This was my favorite post from you by far, ever. I can't get enough of the Peru stuff. The frogs are all so incredible, I can't even imagine my mental state if I saw them in person. Looking forward to trying to get out more this year. Hopefully we can get some herping in, and I'll try to herp better. Let's do a Snow Dogs trip soon?

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by cherper » January 1st, 2014, 3:41 pm

Mike,
Excellent post of an excellent year! I'm jealous of your Baja and Amazon trips. I look forward to getting out in the field with you again...maybe in 2014?

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Jeff Lemm » January 1st, 2014, 3:50 pm

Wow, you killed it! Epic post amigo!

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by John Williams » January 1st, 2014, 4:11 pm

Great post and looks like a stellar year to me. Much too many things to comment on but the new Pristimantis was extra cool. Loved the Baja stuff as well and that little garter sure is pretty. You should make another Texas trip.

John

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by hellihooks » January 1st, 2014, 4:35 pm

POTY, IMO... :thumb: I've dreamed of seeing a worm lizard. I really liked the rock lizard, as well. jim

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Carl Koch » January 1st, 2014, 4:59 pm

Amazing -- what a great year! Goblin toad, variable clowns, aquatic coral, bushmaster, Kirtland's, gorgeous blue racer, Baja worm lizard, Catalina chuck and baja collared...tons of favorites in here for me. Great "toad-sticker" shot of the platirhinos. Congrats!

Carl

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Kent VanSooy » January 1st, 2014, 5:59 pm

That's a lot of life, and a lot of fine shootin'! The goblin frog is quite amazing! Thanks Mike.

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Tim Borski » January 1st, 2014, 10:19 pm

Mr. Mike, when I get big I wanna be like you.

Tim

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by JAMAUGHN » January 1st, 2014, 10:58 pm

Amazing post, Mike, from beginning to end. Thanks for sharing this.

JimM

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by AndyO'Connor » January 2nd, 2014, 7:55 am

I'm glad I was able to share some of the amazing finds with you from Baja and the Croatan. I hope we can meet up in the field again soon! Excellent post sir. Excellent.

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Zach_Lim » January 2nd, 2014, 9:46 am

Breathtaking.

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by TravisK » January 2nd, 2014, 9:58 am

That Worm Lizard is EPIC! I am so weird because that is probably the top species in the world I would like to see. Great post!

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Carl Brune » January 2nd, 2014, 3:41 pm

Nice stuff. I particularly liked the Kirtland's and the baja stuff.

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Mike Pingleton » January 2nd, 2014, 7:56 pm

thanks for all the great replies - I do like sharing the joy of herping.

Carl, one of these days I am going to get a decent shot of a Kirtlands....

-Mike

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Daniel D Dye » January 2nd, 2014, 8:08 pm

Oh Yeah, great stuff here, Mike! As always.
See you in the field.

Happy New Year,

DDD

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Norman D » January 2nd, 2014, 8:34 pm

Great post! So many cool finds! I love the bushmaster and all the rattlesnakes the most!

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Berkeley Boone » January 3rd, 2014, 3:02 am

Dang, 2013 was a good year for you and the herps! Great photos Mike!
Thanks for taking me on another Hot Stove Herping Session!
--Berkeley

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Matt Cage » January 3rd, 2014, 3:53 pm

Mike,

Great photography!! I've been looking forward to this. I'm glad I got to re-live some of those moments here. Wish me luck for another Lachesis next week.

Matt

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Rothdigga » January 3rd, 2014, 4:36 pm

Makes me want to do a Baja trip, especially since I'm so much closer than you. I may bug you for some tips. Really good stuff in here. Thanks for the taking the time to post.

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Ribbit » January 3rd, 2014, 5:25 pm

Matt Cage wrote:Wish me luck for another Lachesis next week.

Matt
Only one? You're thinking too small.

John

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Nshepard » January 3rd, 2014, 6:13 pm

Mike Pingleton wrote:Map Treefrog (Hypsiboas geographicus) Favorite frog ever? Maybe. I love 'em.
Me too!
Mike Pingleton wrote:The bromeliad frogs are beautiful and sometimes difficult to identify. This is the Flat-Headed Bromeliad Frog (Osteocephalus planiceps)
Tough genus to pin to species sometimes, but this individual doesn't strike me as O. planiceps.
Mike Pingleton wrote:Eastern Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis) found crossing the road at dusk one day.
Image
That is a really sweet find. I've only managed to turn up a few reddish garters out that way, all dead (one DOR this past May had insane colors). Wish I could've joined up with everyone on the coast this fall but like much of this past year, money troubles curtailed many of my planned herping trips (1st decemeber to not visit south Florida in 8 years).

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Jeroen Speybroeck » January 5th, 2014, 2:05 am

Excellent! I'm happy to be able to confirm that finding a Lachesis is an absolute highlight :mrgreen: . Maybe I should also do a 2013 review post...
That Bipes is just too weird, fascinating and wonderful.... - definitely a "must see" critter for globe herpers.

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Jeroen Speybroeck » January 5th, 2014, 2:10 am

Nshepard wrote:
Mike Pingleton wrote:The bromeliad frogs are beautiful and sometimes difficult to identify. This is the Flat-Headed Bromeliad Frog (Osteocephalus planiceps)
Tough genus to pin to species sometimes, but this individual doesn't strike me as O. planiceps.
I'd tend to rather agree on planiceps, but if not, maybe deridens?

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Mike Pingleton » January 5th, 2014, 10:39 am

Or perhaps sp. novum. O. planiceps is as close as I could get on that one. I've seen them on both of my trips.
-Mike
Jeroen Speybroeck wrote:
Nshepard wrote:
Mike Pingleton wrote:The bromeliad frogs are beautiful and sometimes difficult to identify. This is the Flat-Headed Bromeliad Frog (Osteocephalus planiceps)
Tough genus to pin to species sometimes, but this individual doesn't strike me as O. planiceps.
I'd tend to rather agree on planiceps, but if not, maybe deridens?

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Antonsrkn » January 5th, 2014, 1:12 pm

I held off commenting on this until I had a nice chunk of time to look it over. This is amazing, so many top notch herps that many of us dream about finding someday. Started off strong with some incredible amphibians (the more I herp the more I like amphibs), and just got better from there! Congrats on an amazing 2013, best of luck this year too!

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Jeroen Speybroeck » January 6th, 2014, 2:12 am

BTW, I believe your Ranitomeya duellmani is R. uakarii. The former is actually a name which has been placed in synonymy with R. ventrimaculata. To add to possible confusion, the more yellow-striped ventrimaculata morphs now belong to (at least?) R. amazonica and/or R. variabilis (see Brown et al. (2001) for comprehensive background reading; http://www.jasonleebrown.org/jasonleebr ... tomeya.pdf).

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by azatrox » January 6th, 2014, 5:23 am

...their call is a distinctive nasal 'wurk, wurk wurk'

Someone needs to tell those frogs that too much 'wurk' and not enough 'herp' makes Jack a dull boy.

Nice post Mike. Looks like you had a great '13.

- Kris

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Cole Grover » January 6th, 2014, 12:29 pm

You knocked it out of the park again, Mike! I'm with you on the Hypsiboas geographicus, though I've never seen on in the flesh. That Bolitoglossa had to have been up there as far as bitchin' finds go, though, along with the Bipes. One hell of a year, man. Nice stuff.

-Cole

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by TimCO » January 12th, 2014, 8:12 pm

Another ripper year amigo. Stay thirsty.

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by moloch » January 14th, 2014, 11:03 am

What an excellent year, Mike, with trips to the Peru and Baja. Great shots and finds. It always is fun to see these "Hot Stove Herping" posts.

Regards,
David

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Will Wells » January 15th, 2014, 7:13 am

Nice work last year, I cant wait to see what you photo this year.

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by BillMcGighan » January 15th, 2014, 10:32 am

I can't find one area that I like more than another, Mike!
:beer: :beer:

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by MichaelCravens » January 18th, 2014, 8:47 pm

Wow Mike! You've had one amazing year. I couldn't be happier for you.

Michael Cravens

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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by T radix » January 19th, 2014, 12:27 pm

Great post! Somehow in all my years I have never heard of a goblin toad let alone seen a photo of one. Quite spectacular...though my favorite herp would probably be the Kirtland's.

Joe

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Mike Pingleton
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Re: Hot Stove Herping: 2013 EOY post

Post by Mike Pingleton » February 17th, 2014, 12:45 pm

Jeroen, thanks so much for that link! And thanks for the comments, everyone.
-Mike
Jeroen Speybroeck wrote:BTW, I believe your Ranitomeya duellmani is R. uakarii. The former is actually a name which has been placed in synonymy with R. ventrimaculata. To add to possible confusion, the more yellow-striped ventrimaculata morphs now belong to (at least?) R. amazonica and/or R. variabilis (see Brown et al. (2001) for comprehensive background reading; http://www.jasonleebrown.org/jasonleebr ... tomeya.pdf).

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