Spring Seep as a Microhabitat?

Dedicated exclusively to field herping.

Moderator: Scott Waters

Post Reply
MCHerper
Posts: 443
Joined: September 22nd, 2012, 5:13 pm

Spring Seep as a Microhabitat?

Post by MCHerper » June 11th, 2014, 3:57 pm

Hey Folks,

I'm interested in this habitat and learning more about the conditions that shape it and the benefits to amphibian populations.

Have there ever been studies done on the abiotic conditions in spring seeps in the winter and their effects on amphibian populations and predators/prey? I have (carefully) observed several spring seeps and seepage areas during winter months and notice some patterns in how far most of the population is from the 'head' of the seep or spring. I can't help but to wonder if the water near the spring head is less oxygen-rich and if most of the amphibians tend not to go too far up toward the head, instead seeking cooler water and a more oxygen-rich environment. Also, I notice that I find the amphibians right around the areas where I find the insect larvae in the seep, which I imagine is not a coincidence.

Thanks for any info you can share.

User avatar
spinifer
Posts: 2388
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 9:48 am
Location: Delmarva

Re: Spring Seep as a Microhabitat?

Post by spinifer » June 20th, 2014, 2:55 pm

springs have plenty of O2 in the winter, and maintain a relatively constant temperature of about 50F. Thats why several species overwinter in springs (e.g. pickerel frogs). Although stream salamanders are active year round in springs, there is very little if any feeding over the winter.

MCHerper
Posts: 443
Joined: September 22nd, 2012, 5:13 pm

Re: Spring Seep as a Microhabitat?

Post by MCHerper » June 21st, 2014, 5:44 pm

Thank you!

Post Reply