My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up!

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jonathan
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My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up!

Post by jonathan »

Back in June, Scott Trageser led a team of 8 Americans and Australians on a two-week trip to assist the Bangladesh Python Project. Well, it was sort of a herping/wildlife photography/ecotourism trip, but assisting the python project was the whole reason the trip happened and the basis for our herping and photography activities while we were there.

I wrote a four-part series on our experiences for David Steen's Living Alongside Wildlife blog. You can read Part 1 of our trip at the following link. Please comment post any comments/questions about the trip on that blog. Parts 2-4 will be published on consectutive days:

http://www.livingalongsidewildlife.com/ ... oject.html




Here I'm just going to post some of our herping photos. I'll start out with the frogs. Frog diversity in Lawachara National Park, the site of the Bangladesh Python Project, was simply amazing. Biking an 8km road through the park at night I could come up with 12 frog species in a single pass, and 15 frog species in two nights. Caesar has recorded 18-19 species in the park (unsure on whether there are 1 or 2 species of Fejerverya), and there are certainly more to be found. Here's what we saw:




Smith's Litter Frog ("Vampire Frog") Leptobrachium smithi. He has his head down in that way because he's scared.

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Mating

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Juvenile being pretty

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Cope's Assam Frog Sylviarana leptoglossa

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Skittering Frog Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis

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Calling in typical floating stance

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One of the Cricket Frog species, I think Fejerverya teraiensis. Possible range extension

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Common Indian Toad Duttaphynus melanostictus

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Asian Painted Frog Kaloula pulchera

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Berdmore's Narrowmouth Frogs Microhyla berdmorei with Ornate Narrowmouth Frog Microhyla ornata. I rescued these three from a recently dug construction pit

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Ornate Narrowmouth Frog Microhyla ornata - one of the tiniest fully-formed froglets I've ever seen

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Adults - there's no chance that they are Microhyla rubra, is there?

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Inornate Froglet Micryletta inornata - range extension to Bangladesh was very recent, may be distinct species

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Bird-poop Treefrog Theloderma asperun

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Mating Four-lined Treefrogs Polypedates leucomystax. Right on the road, and the female was enormous

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Chriomantis treefrog Chiromantis simus? - DOR. Possible range extension.

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Rhacophorus Treefrog Rhacophorus bipunctatus? - DOR

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another DOR

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Indian Bullfrog Hoptobatrachus tigerinus

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Point-nosed Frog Clinotarsus alticola

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this one has something funky going on with its head - deformity or hybridization?

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Bhamo Frog Humerana humeralis in the only swamp forest left in Bangladesh (not found in Lawachara)

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Frog list for our time in Lawachara National Park

Common Indian Toad Duttaphynus melanostictus
Skipper Frog Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis
Cricket Frog Fejerverya teraiensis
Indian Bullfrog Hoptobatrachus tigerinus
Smith's Litter Frog Leptobrachium smithi
Asian Painted Frog Kaloula pulchera
Ornate Microhylid Frog Microhyla ornata
Berdmore's Microhylid Frog Microhyla berdmorei
Inornate Froglet? Micryletta inornata (possibly other/new Micryletta sp.)
Point-nosed Frog Clinotarsus alticola
Cope's Assam Frog Sylviarana leptoglossa
Annadale's Tree Frog? Chiromantis simus? (possibly other Chiromantis sp.) - DOR only
Asian Brown Tree Frog Polypedates leucomystax
Bird-poop Tree Frog Theloderma asperun
Twin-spotted Tree Frog? Rhacophorus bipunctatus? (possibly other Rhacophorus sp.) - DOR only



Total Frog list for our time in Bangladesh

Common Indian Toad Duttaphynus melanostictus
Skipper Frog Euphlyctis cyanophlyctis
Cricket Frog Fejerverya teraiensis
Crab-eating Frog Fejervarya carnivora - Sundarbans only
Bhamo Frog Humerana humeralis - Swamp Forest only
Indian Bullfrog Hoptobatrachus tigerinus
Smith's Litter Frog Leptobrachium smithi
Asian Painted Frog Kaloula pulchera
Ornate Microhylid Frog Microhyla ornata
Berdmore's Microhylid Frog Microhyla berdmorei
Inornate Froglet? Micryletta inornata (possibly other/new Micryletta sp.)
Point-nosed Frog Clinotarsus alticola
Cope's Assam Frog Sylviarana leptoglossa
Annadale's Tree Frog? Chiromantis simus? (possibly other Chiromantis sp.) - DOR only
Asian Brown Tree Frog Polypedates leucomystax
Bird-poop Tree Frog Theloderma asperun
Twin-spotted Tree Frog? Rhacophorus bipunctatus? (possibly other Rhacophorus sp.) - DOR only


Snakes, lizards, tortoises, gibbons, inverts, and all that to follow soon.

If you are interested in the Bangladesh Python Project, you can read more at: http://www.facebook.com/bangladeshpythonproject
If you would like to go on next year's trip, let Scott know at: http://www.naturestills.com/contact
If you would like to donate to support the Bangladesh Python Project, you can do that through The Orianne Society at http://www.oriannesociety.org/burmese-python

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jonathan
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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project

Post by jonathan »

p.s. - I already wrote about the Sundarbans portion of our trip here: http://www.fieldherpforum.com/forum/vie ... =2&t=20050

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project

Post by jonathan »

Part 2 of my write-up on the trip, focusing on herping and transects, can be viewed at the following link:

http://www.livingalongsidewildlife.com/ ... adesh.html




And here are some lizard and tortoise photos from Lawachara (my description of the tortoise relocation and radiotracking project was in Part 1 yesterday.)



Emma's Forest Lizard Calotes emma

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Green Fan-throated Lizard Pyctocolaemus gularis

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Bent-toed Geckos Crytodactylus sp., possibly C. khasiensis, possibly two species

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Flat-tailed House Gecko Hemidactylus platyurus (without leg)

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Spiny-tailed House Gecko Hemidactylus frenatus

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Would this be a different house gecko species? Hemidactylus sp.

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One of many many Tokay Geckos Gekko gecko

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Lockie holding a "dead on train tracks" Water Monitor Varanus salvator. This was a range extension

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Reeve's Smooth Skink Scincella reevesi

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Also Reeve's Smooth Skink, or something else?

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and then how about this one?

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Inspecting an Elongated Tortoise's Indotestudo elongata health before release

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Affixing the transmitter to an Elongated Tortoise before radiotracking

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Bangladeshi journalists photographing the proceedings

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Talking to villagers about the tortoises

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Checking the radio signal after first Elongated Tortoise is released back into the wild

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Elongated Tortoise ready to be relocated into forest

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see the radiotransmitter?

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Radiotracked Elongated Tortoise

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moving at very early morning

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This is why you can't find them when you're not tracking them

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Pretending to radiotrack after I've already found the tortoise

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Lizard, Tortoise, and Croc species list for Lawachara Park

Emma's Forest Lizard Calotes emma
Common Garden Lizard Calotes versicolor
Green Fan-throated Lizard Pyctocolaemus gularis
Khasi Hill Bent-toed Gecko Crytodactylus khasiensis
Bent-toed Gecko? possibly other/new Crytodactylus sp.?
Tokay Gecko Gekko gecko
Flat-tailed House Gecko Hemidactylus platyurus
Common House Gecko Hemidactylus frenatus
Possible additional House Gecko Hemidactylus sp.
Reeve's Ground Skink Scincella reevesi
Keeled Grass Skink Mabuya multifasciata
Bronze Grass Skink Mabuya macularia
Water Monitor Varanus salvator – range extension and new record for park

Elongated Tortoise Indotestudo elongata



Full Lizard, Tortoise, and Croc List for Bangladesh trip

Emma's Forest Lizard Calotes emma
Common Garden Lizard Calotes versicolor
Green Fan-throated Lizard Pyctocolaemus gularis
Khasi Hill Bent-toed Gecko Crytodactylus khasiensis
Bent-toed Gecko? possibly other/new Crytodactylus sp.?
Tokay Gecko Gekko gecko
Brook's House Gecko Hemidactylus brooki
Flat-tailed House Gecko Hemidactylus platyurus
Yellow-bellied House Gecko Hemidatylus flaviviridus
Common House Gecko Hemidactylus frenatus
Possible additional House Gecko? Hemidactylus sp.?
Reeve's Ground Skink Scincella reevesi
Keeled Grass Skink Mabuya multifasciata
Bronze Grass Skink Mabuya macularia
Bengal Monitor Varanus bengalensis
Water Monitor Varanus salvator – range extension and new record for park

Elongated Tortoise Indotestudo elongata

Salt-water Crocodile Crocodylus postorus

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - tortoise pi

Post by jonathan »

Part 3 of the trip report is published today. In this part I focused on our interactions with Bangladeshis and the contribution they are trying to make to wildlife conservation. I also wrote up the highlight of our time in Lawachara – finding our target species, a Banded Krait, while it is eating a still-alive Indian Wolf Snake!

You can view Part 3 here:

http://www.livingalongsidewildlife.com/ ... krait.html



Here are some snake photos from the trip. The python photos are here, but the actual description of how the python aspect of the python project is going will come in Part 4 tomorrow. (Along with a few better python pics.)


Spot-tailed Pit Vipers Trimeresurus erythrurus

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A kukri snake Oligodon sp. we're still trying to ID. Possibly a new species or range extension. I have my vote in, but want to see what others think. ;)

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Green Cat Snake Boiga cyanea

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juvenile

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reminds me of a muppet

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Lockie giving the GES students an adult to handle

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Tawny Cat Snake Boiga ochracea - DOR. This was a range extension when Caesar wrote it up in 2012.

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Caeser inspecting a Copperhead Trinket Snake Coelognalthus radiatus found by villagers

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One of many Zaw's Wolf Snakes Lycodon zawi. Caesar wrote these guys up as a new COUNTRY record a couple years back. We saw them almost daily.

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This one was gobbling a skink when we spotted it

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Indian Wolf Snake Lycodon aulicus

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Banded Krait Bungarus fasciatus eating Indian Wolf Snake

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Banded Krait

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Common Slug-eating Snake Pareas monticola

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Painted Keelback Xenocrophis ceracegastor - not only was this one of our funnest catches, but it was a range extension (found in the swamp forest)

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Checkered Keelback Xenocrophis piscator

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juvenile Checkered Keelback

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juvenile Himalayan Keelback Rhabdophis himalayanus, yet another one Caeser got a range extension on when he first found it here

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Collared Black-headed Snake Sibynophis collaris - Caeser made a range/elevation extension for this species a couple years back. Road kills don't get much uglier than this

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12-foot Radiotracked Burmese Python Python bivittatus. This one would eat a civet a few weeks later.

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Daytime radio-tracking find

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Caesar and Max riding on the top of public transport on the way to get a python

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Rare non-radiotracked Burmese Python as found

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Max and Lockie grab the python (with Caeser)

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Me helping measure a Burmese Python that had gotten into someone's ducks

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(Tomorrow's Part 4 of the Living Alongside Wildlife article will include some better python shots taken by other people.)




Snake list for our time in Lawachara National Park

Burmese Python Python bivittatus
Green Cat Snake Boiga cyanea
Tawny Cat Snake Boiga ochracea – DOR only
Copperhead Trinket Snake Coelognalthus radiatus
Painted Bronzeback Dendrelaphis pictus
Common Wolf Snake Lycodon aulicus
Zaw's Wolf Snake Lycodon zawi
Kukri Snake sp. Oligodon sp.
Common Slug-eating Snake Pareas monticola
Himalayan Keelback Rhabdophis himalayanus
Collared Black-headed Snake Sibynophis collaris – DOR only
Banded Krait Bungarus fasciatus
Spot-tailed Pit Viper Trimeresurus erythrurus



Full snake list for our trip in Bangladesh

White-headed Blind Snake Ramphotyphlops albiceps – range extension/country record (near Sundarbans)
Burmese Python Python bivittatus
Long-nosed Vine Snake Ahaetulla nasuta (Sundarbans)
Brown Vine Snake Ahaetulla pulverulenta (Sundarbans)
Striped Keelback Amphiesma stolatum (northwest Bangladesh)
Green Cat Snake Boiga cyanea
Tawny Cat Snake Boiga ochracea – DOR only
Copperhead Trinket Snake Coelognalthus radiatus
Painted Bronzeback Dendrelaphis pictus
Common Wolf Snake Lycodon aulicus
Zaw's Wolf Snake Lycodon zawi
Cantor's Kukri Snake? Oligodon cyclurus? (possibly other Oligodon sp.)
Assam Snail-eater Pareas monticola
Himalayan Keelback Rhabdophis himalayanus
Collared Black-headed Snake Sibynophis collaris – DOR only
Painted Keelback Xenocrophis ceracegastor – range extension (swamp forest)
Checkered Keelback Xenocrophis piscator (swamp forest and Sundarbans)
Dog-faced Water Snake Cerberus rynchops (Sundarbans)
Glossy Marsh Snake Gerarda prevastiana (Sundarbans)
Banded Krait Bungarus fasciatus
Common Krait Bungarus caeruleus (northwest Bangladesh)
Monocled Cobra Naja kaouthia (Sundarbans)
Spot-tailed Pit Viper Trimeresurus erythrurus

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - snake pics

Post by Chaitanya »

awesome finds. I would vote for Oligodon taeniolatus for that kukri. although without scale counts can't tell for sure as there are one or two similar oligodons found in Bangladesh.

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - snake pics

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Part 4, the conclusion to my trip report, published today. In the final part I focus on the python-radiotracking project and on the intersection between people and wildlife that we're trying to navigate.

http://www.livingalongsidewildlife.com/ ... ython.html




Here are some mammal, bird, and invertebrate shots



Phayre's Leaf Monkey (Trachypithecus phayrei) - my favorite primate in the park

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Capped Langur (Trachypithecus pileatus)

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Hoolock Gibbons (Hoolock hoolock)

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One of three Macaque species in the park

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Some sort of rat species

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Some birds - I'll post any larger pics if anyone asks

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Here are some invertebrates


Spiders, many with odd appendages

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Insects that were bigger than I thought they would be

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A few other odd little things

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Scott showing GES members how to photograph wildlife (photos courtesy of Animesh Ghose)

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Tea plantation the borders/fills much of the park

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - tortoise pi

Post by Keeper »

Great trip and exciting photos! Thanks for sharing! :)
Not 100% familiar with all the Indian herptiles, but I don't think this juvenile Rhabdophis specimen is R. himalayanus.
jonathan wrote:Part 3 of the trip report is published today. In this part I focused on our interactions with Bangladeshis and the contribution they are trying to make to wildlife conservation. I also wrote up the highlight of our time in Lawachara – finding our target species, a Banded Krait, while it is eating a still-alive Indian Wolf Snake!

juvenile Himalayan Keelback Rhabdophis himalayanus, yet another one Caeser got a range extension on when he first found it here

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[/i]
Here are a juvenile and an adult that I photographed in Medog, southern Tibet. Note the distinct pair of orange patterns on the occipital and the orange on the neck and the dorsal body.
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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - snake pics

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Do you have any alternative ideas for the ID?

I'm not very familiar with the species and I'm not the one that ID'd that snake, but in Asia color patterns can be quite variable, especially across large distances within the range. Of course, part of the reason for that is due to cryptic species that haven't been identified as deserving separate species status yet.

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - snake pics

Post by Jeroen Speybroeck »

Outstanding! I particularly enjoyed the banded krait shots.

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - snake pics

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Good to see you been getting your herp on... :thumb: shame that part of the world will be one of the first to be submerged when ocean levels rise. jim

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - snake pics

Post by JAMAUGHN »

Fantastic post, Jonathan. I'll be coming back to this one many, many times.

JimM

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project

Post by Kevin Messenger »

Great pics all around, and awesome species!

jonathan wrote: Reeve's Smooth Skink Scincella reevesi

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Also Reeve's Smooth Skink, or something else?

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and then how about this one?

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I don't think any of these are Scincella, they look more like Sphenomorphus. A young Sphenomorphus is incredibly easy to confuse with Scincella and I see mis-IDs all over the place.

Here is a pic by Michael Cota of a reevesii from Thailand:
ImageScincella reevesii by Herpetologe, on Flickr

and here's one from Thomas Brown in Hong Kong:
ImageReeves' Smooth Skink (Scincella reevesii) 南滑蜥 by Thomas H Brown, on Flickr

One of the "keys" between the two genera is how bulbous the eyes are. Scincella has a very flat profile. Sphenomorphus eyes/ face, has a bit more of a "profile to it" - more curves. Does that make sense?

I'm not familiar with the herps in the region, so I don't know of alternative species. But pretty sure about the genus (in that it is not Scincella).

Here, I just threw this together to help illustrate the head differences (left side is Scincella, right side is Sphenomorphus):
ImageScincella vs Sphenomorphusv3 by Kevin Messenger, on Flickr

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - tortoise pi

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Keeper wrote:Great trip and exciting photos! Thanks for sharing! :)
Not 100% familiar with all the Indian herptiles, but I don't think this juvenile Rhabdophis specimen is R. himalayanus.

Here are a juvenile and an adult that I photographed in Medog, southern Tibet. Note the distinct pair of orange patterns on the occipital and the orange on the neck and the dorsal body.
I just talked to the person who made that ID, and he said that scale counts definitely confirm R. himalayanus.

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project

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Kevin Messenger wrote:I don't think any of these are Scincella, they look more like Sphenomorphus. A young Sphenomorphus is incredibly easy to confuse with Scincella and I see mis-IDs all over the place.
I'm the one who ID'd that skink, and I was basing it mostly off of the ear opening. I read that Scincella reeversi has an oval ear opening, Sphenomorphus indicus has a circular ear opening with a deeply sunk tympanum, and Sphenomorphus maculatus has a tympanum that is not deeply sunk. That skink appeared to me to have an oval, deeply sunk tympanum, so that cancelled out the two Spehenomorphus species that I'm aware of being possibilities in the area.

However, I hate little skinks and have a horrible time trying to ID them. So if I interpreted that characteristic wrong, or if there are other ID characteristics that are more accurate, then I'll easily believe that I'm wrong. Do you believe that all three skinks pictured are the same species?

Here are a couple additional pics of the first one:

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - snake pics

Post by Kevin Messenger »

I think it is almost certainly Sphenomorphus (it just can't be Scincella - if it still keys out as Scincella, then someone needs to re-work the species over there, something funky is going on).

That very last pic, if I saw nothing but that, I would have thought S. indicus. But the lateral coloration is like nothing I've seen from indicus. Not to say the indicus way over there might look slightly different. Any neighboring Sphenomorphus candidates that could be a range extension?

The only thing I can say with certainty is not Scincella. And it looks very, very Sphenomorphus like.

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

Post by jonathan »

Looking at those photos and my old photos of Scincella from Thailand (ID'd by others), I'm pretty certain that you're right.

I need to learn more about these two genera. Neither one has occurred anywhere I've lived (Bangkok and central India), but they keep showing up in places I go (Bangladesh and Phnom Penh and northern Thailand). It would be helpful to figure out how to make clear ID's of them.

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

Post by jonathan »

Just in case the links have gotten buried in the midst of the pictures....

The trip account (with more photos) can be read at the following links:

Part One: Snake Call! An introduction to the Bangladesh Python Project
Part Two: Travelers and Transects: Our role helping the project
Part Three: Stubborn Students and Kanai's Krait: the Bangladeshis we worked with
Part Four: Pythons and the land: is there space for us and wildlife to coexist?



If you are interested in the Bangladesh Python Project, you can read more at: http://www.facebook.com/bangladeshpythonproject

The dates have been set for next year's trip. If you would like to go, let Scott know at: http://www.naturestills.com/contact

If you would like to donate to support the Bangladesh Python Project, you can do that through The Orianne Society at http://www.oriannesociety.org/burmese-python

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - snake pics

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Chaitanya wrote:awesome finds. I would vote for Oligodon taeniolatus for that kukri. although without scale counts can't tell for sure as there are one or two similar oligodons found in Bangladesh.
Good guess, but this specimen had 19 scale rows at mid-body. O. taeniolatus, according to my sources, has 15. Another guess now that you know that scale count?

(I have a guess at what you might guess next, and I'll tell you why I disagree.)

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - snake pics

Post by Chaitanya »

jonathan wrote:
Chaitanya wrote:awesome finds. I would vote for Oligodon taeniolatus for that kukri. although without scale counts can't tell for sure as there are one or two similar oligodons found in Bangladesh.
Good guess, but this specimen had 19 scale rows at mid-body. O. taeniolatus, according to my sources, has 15. Another guess now that you know that scale count?

(I have a guess at what you might guess next, and I'll tell you why I disagree.)
Only oligodon from that part with 19 rows at midbody is Oligodon cyclurus. You are right O. taeniolatus has 15 rows midbody and Oligodon cinereus has 17 rows at midbody. Nice find.

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

Post by jonathan »

Yup - O. cyclurus is the only one known from that area with 19 scale rows at midbody. But have you ever seen a cyclurus, in person or in any literature, with a pattern anything remotely like that snake? (Also, aren't they typically a bit more heavy-bodied?)

The scale counts in general fit cyclurus, but they could also fit taeniatus (except ventrals/subcaudals, which aren't the best diagnostics and can vary with range). I haven't seen a lot of taeniatus, but the ones I've seen look more like that than the cyclurus photos I've seen. The range extension wouldn't be huge, and that's an area that's badly undersampled and range extensions are popping up frequently. Thoughts?

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

Post by klawnskale »

Wonderful account of your field experiences in Bangladesh. What a unique opportunity working in a country that has yet to have its flora and fauna thoroughly researched. Glad to see the local people are becoming more involved in conservation. Have you ever thought about venturing into Myanmar to be a part of similar projects? I guess it is called Burma again (?) After reading Slowinski's biography it made very curious about that region of the world.

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

Post by jonathan »

The main two reasons that I did this particular trip was because Bangladesh was extremely accessible to me and because I was invited. Because of that, now that I found out how much I am a fan of Caesar and appreciate the work he's doing, I can go back fairly regularly. Unfortunately, Burma is more difficult for me to get in and out of, and I don't already know anyone there. But I have a fairly intense day job, so one big project is enough for me anyway.

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

Post by Zach Cava »

Great series Jon, glad it worked out!

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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

Post by chrish »

Spectacular, I look forward to reading the whole trip log.
Spot-tailed Pit Vipers Trimeresurus erythrurus
Gorgeous snake,....but who decided a green snake with a red tail and the epithet erythrurus should be called "Spot-tailed"? :crazyeyes:

Was Red-tailed already used for another species?
Some birds - I'll post any larger pics if anyone asks
Wouldn't it be great if there was herping forum somewhere that had a bird forum where you could share pics like this.....oh wait...we have one! :lol:

Just in case my sarcasm wasn't clear....we're asking you to share on the bird forum. Its been a bit slow over there. Besides, Brahminy Kite is one of my favorite birds in the world so any post with one of those is automatically awesome.

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jonathan
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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

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chrish wrote:
Some birds - I'll post any larger pics if anyone asks
Wouldn't it be great if there was herping forum somewhere that had a bird forum where you could share pics like this.....oh wait...we have one! :lol:

Just in case my sarcasm wasn't clear....we're asking you to share on the bird forum. Its been a bit slow over there. Besides, Brahminy Kite is one of my favorite birds in the world so any post with one of those is automatically awesome.
Thanks for your kind words chrish!

Yeah, just wanted to know if there was anything there anyone wanted to look at. I'm not a very good birder, and I'm not sure if I get interesting enough stuff to show off.

Unfortunately, I hardly got any bird pics in Lawachara National Park - just a parakeet and a bee-eater and a Crested Serpant Eagle. The best bird I saw there, the enormous Brown Fish Owl hunting in the rice paddy, was simply too far away to even try for a picture at night. But I did get some nice raptors and kingfishes and other stuff in the Sundarbans, and I'll post those on the bird forum now that you asked.

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Chaitanya
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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

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jonathan wrote:Yup - O. cyclurus is the only one known from that area with 19 scale rows at midbody. But have you ever seen a cyclurus, in person or in any literature, with a pattern anything remotely like that snake? (Also, aren't they typically a bit more heavy-bodied?)

The scale counts in general fit cyclurus, but they could also fit taeniatus (except ventrals/subcaudals, which aren't the best diagnostics and can vary with range). I haven't seen a lot of taeniatus, but the ones I've seen look more like that than the cyclurus photos I've seen. The range extension wouldn't be huge, and that's an area that's badly undersampled and range extensions are popping up frequently. Thoughts?
Sorry for my delayed response. I haven't seen a single O. cyclurus personally yet. Every year I plan to visit North East India, and plans get cancelled out. I did find some pics of the same from Indian states neighbouring Bangladesh. Here is a link : http://www.indiansnakes.org/content/cantors-kukri-snake . Oligodon, Rahbdops, Lycodons, and Trimeresurus from East and North east India are not that well described yet. The exact scale counts for O. cyclurus are mentioned on that web page so just confirm whether they match or not. They also have all the details of O. taeniatus(and many Indian snakes) on that web site and that might help you out.
O. taeniatus that I get to see here in western ghats tend to vary a lot within short geographic locations. Here are some photos of O. taeniatus that I have photographed around western ghats.

From Goa:

ImageIMG_8786 by Chaitanya Shukla, on Flickr

From Pune(Maharashtra) both were found in areas separated by 30-35 kms.

ImageRussels Kukri by Chaitanya Shukla, on Flickr

ImageRussel's Kukri Snake by Chaitanya Shukla, on Flickr


On a side note, if you ever plan to visit Western ghats just let me know. I know a lot of good herpers and researchers doing good work in ghats.

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jonathan
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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

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Thank you very much for the offer. I certainly want to spend some time in the Western Ghats someday, though now that I'm hooked on doing work in Bangladesh that trip (which was supposed to be in 2015), is now postponed into the indefinite future.

Thank you for the O. cyclurus pics. Those photos indeed look very much like our specimen, and nothing like the other photos I had seen. I think I am leaning strongly in that direction as well.

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Chaitanya
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Re: My Trip with the Bangladesh Python Project - all pics up

Post by Chaitanya »

jonathan wrote:Thank you very much for the offer. I certainly want to spend some time in the Western Ghats someday, though now that I'm hooked on doing work in Bangladesh that trip (which was supposed to be in 2015), is now postponed into the indefinite future.

Thank you for the O. cyclurus pics. Those photos indeed look very much like our specimen, and nothing like the other photos I had seen. I think I am leaning strongly in that direction as well.
Bangladesh shares a lot of biodiversity with surrounding Indian states, although that country is a sad state of affair. Still its a beautiful country with a lot of herps.
You can publish the record of range extension if you are sure of that oligodon being a O. cyclurus . Whenever you plan to visit the western ghats just make sure its during monsoons. I will be heading for southern ghats soon for a survey and herping trip.

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