Thailand with Mathias

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Mourits
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Thailand with Mathias

Post by Mourits »

My friend Mathias Holm and I were in Thailand for a few days this week.

But what happened when we were just going to drive to the airport? My camera broke! And it couldn't be repaired immediately.. I had to borrow a camera instead, a Canon EOS 20D.. a camera that I didn't have any experience using... that's why some of my pics maybe isn't in the best quality.

We stayed in Hua Hin in a big hotel at the beach.

First some pics of some of the extremely common house geckos (Probably Hemidactylus platyurus):

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The tokays were sadly almost extinct in the area due to the capture for the terrarium hobby...
A man told us that 3 tokays could fetch up to 10,000 baht! (About 320 USD) A lot for a poor family in Thailand!

But luckily we found some fused trees with a big hole that made a perfect habitat for minimum 10 tokays in different sizes, even skeletons from the last generations could be found in the hole. Probably one of the only spots in the area for tokays Gekko gecko:

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Just outside of the hotel resort we found some big stumps that we flipped.

We flipped a few Dixonius siamensis [LIFER]:

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And some Lygosoma bowringii [LIFER]

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In the evenings we found a lot of amphibians to, although their breeding ponds was limited to ornamental ponds and fountains.

We found a lot of the common toads, Duttaphrynus melanosticus:

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And also some of the very nice treefrogs, Polypedates leucomystax [LIFER]:

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Here some tadpoles, probably same species:

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We did also found a lot of the really cool frog, Kaloula pulchra! In the first evenings we did only found hatchlings, but it rained the last night and there it was teeming with them! Btw, the make the most fantastic croaking I've ever heard!:

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In the rainy evening we did also found some Limnonectes limnocharis, with- and without backstripe:

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Mathias photographing one:

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We did also see a lot Calotes versicolor's! But they were behind a big locked fence, and they were very hard to photograph.. But one day when we were going out to eat on a restaurant, we saw an individual in a tree, we caught it and took some fast snapshots:

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We did also found an young lavish beautiful Ahaetulla nasuta [LIFER]:

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At the beach one day we found these strange creatures, anyone know what it is?

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We were riding elephants, watching cobra / crocodile show, held a Crocodylus porosus, and stuff like that:

Mathias:

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Me:

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We spend the last day in Bangkok were we visited a park that I discovered last year, a park with a lot of turtles and really big water monitors, some of them about 10 feet long!

Here a Malayemys subtrujuga with a injured shell, maybe a monitor had tried to eat it?:

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A mediumsized Varanus salvator:

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Some eating monitors:

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We caught a small monitor, probably in it's first shed:

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In the park we flipped;

1 Ramphotyphlops albiceps :

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Mathias holding it:

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2 Riopa punctatus [LIFER]:

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And 3 Lygosoma quadrupes [LIFER]:

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Species seen but not photographed: Chitra chitra, Mabuya multifasciata, Trachemys scripta elegans, Leiolepis belliana

Thanks for watching!

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dezertwerx
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by dezertwerx »

Nice selection of herps. Congrats on what looks like a fun trip!

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AndyO'Connor
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by AndyO'Connor »

The marine creatures appear to by fireworms, Hermodice sp. If i am right, which I might not be, good thing you didn't touch them the wrong way, they can deliver a very nasty sting from what I have read....

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Kevin Messenger
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Kevin Messenger »

Mourits wrote:
In the rainy evening we did also found some Kaloula pulchra, with- and without backstripe:

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Just fyi, these aren't Kaloula, this is the Fejervarya complex (I don't know which species in Thailand). Great pics all around though!! We need more from Thailand

Mourits
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Mourits »

Thanks everyone:D

Fireworms? Interesting information.

I know, it is a Limnonectes limnocharis. writing fail! :?

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klawnskale
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by klawnskale »

Nice animals. Love The A. nausta! Gosh, if I wouldn't know better i would have thought those were the tadpoles of Xenopus! Gah! say it aint so; and they are NOT invasive there!

Mourits
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Mourits »

Thanks, and yeah they really look a like those to tadpole species, pretty wierd cause the adult are totally different from each other! :o

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justinm
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by justinm »

Really nice post, looks like a nice trip. I don't think that Tokays fetch quite so much money. It's still sad to hear they're declining due to overcollecting. The tadpoles look a lot like Xenopus levi that I hatched out once.

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Hans Breuer (twoton)
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Hans Breuer (twoton) »

Nice!! Thanks for sharing!
Limnonectes limnocharis.
I just fed two of those "rice field frogs" to one of my snakes last night. But I used to know them as Rana limnocharis. Has there been a reclassification, or is it a different beast?

Mourits
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Mourits »

Thanks :)

Justin:
I don't think it's that much either for 3 tokays, but certainly enough to make them collect all of the geckos... :?

Hans:
I don't know about any reclassification, and I don't know which name is up to date... But i'm sure that it is the same species! :idea:

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Jeff
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Jeff »

Mourits

Your Ramphotyphlops is not braminus, but R. albiceps -- much more interesting.

Mourits
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Mourits »

Very cool! Thanks, then it's a LIFER to :beer: ! Pretty funny that it's found inside one of the biggest cities on earth! :shock: It's not a very common species, right?

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Mathias Holm
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Mathias Holm »

Here are my pictures

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Mourits photographing Ahaetulla nasuta:
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Mourits again:
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Mourits:
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Viridovipera
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Viridovipera »

Hans Breuer (twoton) wrote:Nice!! Thanks for sharing!
Limnonectes limnocharis.
I just fed two of those "rice field frogs" to one of my snakes last night. But I used to know them as Rana limnocharis. Has there been a reclassification, or is it a different beast?

Jeez Hans, get with the times. The genus Rana was blown apart like 3-5 years ago. One of its partitions was Limnonectes. Limnonectes was then subsequently blown apart more recently (1-2 years ago). One of its partitions was the genus Fejervarya (I've seen it spelled Feyervaria, Fejervaria and maybe like 3 other ways), native to Asia. Fejervarya limnocharis is an extremely variable and common species found all over SE Asia. I suspect it is due to be blown apart into many different species as well. Check out the work of Guin Wogan (formerly of UC Berkeley) for more information on that complex. I'm not sure how the "blowing up" has gone, nor am I of the specific papers that did the blowing up, all I know is that I was just as confused as you when I saw Rana limnocharis, Limnonectes limnocharis and Fejervarya limnocharis all referring to this common frog. If someone wants to be more detailed than me, please do, this is just what I know.

(The technical term for blown apart would probably be systematic/phylogenetic re-evaluated with genetic and morphological evidence --- but isn't blown apart just more fun?)

Nice post guys! I'm loving to surge of Asian posts on here. It really makes me (second-)home sick.

-Alex

Edit: There are no species of Limnonectes in the US. I just confused it with Lithobates :roll:

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Hans Breuer (twoton)
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Hans Breuer (twoton) »

I just fed two of those "rice field frogs" to one of my snakes last night. But I used to know them as Rana limnocharis. Has there been a reclassification, or is it a different beast?

Jeez Hans, get with the times. The genus Rana was blown apart like 3-5 years ago.
1. Frogs are snake food.

2. I've only been herping for two years. Before that, I didn't even know the difference between a tree frog and a trebuchet.

3. Frogs are snake food.

4. Nobody can pronounce "Fejervarya" anyway

5. Frogs are snake food.
If someone wants to be more detailed than me, please do
By all means, don't. I already had a brain hernia when they blew up Trimeresurus. :-)
I'm loving to surge of Asian posts on here.
Second that!

Hans @ ceterum censeo, ranidae delendam esse

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Viridovipera
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Viridovipera »

Indeed they are snake food. And that's why I like em ;)


Just trying to keep you current on your systematic changes, Hans! :lol: Not really, though, that was just to show that that genus/species is a mess and probably will be for a while. I mean, come on, it's a common frog found everywhere from India to Taiwan to Bali. Sometimes it has a stripe, sometimes it's blotchy, sometimes it's green, sometimes it's orange, sometimes it's yellow, sometimes it's white.... if those aren't the characteristics of a large species-complex re-classification, I don't know what would be. Well, on a different note, this rant is a bit stupid if one doesn't care about dirt common frogs and even less about ever changing taxonomy.

So, in conclusion, you're right, frogs are snake food. And you're also right to be confused about this species' scientific name (and to have trouble pronouncing it) -- it's likely to change again relatively soon. Probably to something much more simple like Fejervaryaranafrogenus limnocharis. Then at least the systematists will be happy. :roll:

-Alex

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Hans Breuer (twoton)
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Hans Breuer (twoton) »

Probably to something much more simple like Fejervaryaranafrogenus limnocharis.
ROTFL!

There are 36 known anuran species in Taiwan, but most of the more interesting ones occur in the South, where I rarely venture. I like their sounds, and I totally dig tree frogs (mainly because I never saw one during my childhood in Germany), but not enough to question the decade-old field guides here or communicate a lot with ranologists.....

Is there a paper somewhere about the blow-up of the genus Rana?

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Nature Nate
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Nature Nate »

those fire worms look like kind of polokeet (bad spelling but spelled phonetically) worm. nice vinegaroon too. I love seeing the inverts from tropical regions that also occur in arid environments. We have those in the USA SW.
Great post.

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Warren
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Warren »

Hans @ ceterum censeo, ranidae delendam esse
Aut viam inveniam aut faciam...

+2 @Thelyphonid!

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Tofuman
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Tofuman »

Great pics :thumb: Makes me wanna go to Thailand even more.

Mourits
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Re: Thailand with Mathias

Post by Mourits »

Thanks everyone! :)

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