2015 so far (Costa Rica, Tennessee, Georgia) lots of photos.

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Saunders
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:42 am
Location: Boerne, Tx

2015 so far (Costa Rica, Tennessee, Georgia) lots of photos.

Post by Saunders » April 22nd, 2015, 3:12 pm

It's been a while since I've posted on here, things have been busy with school and whatnot, but there's been some awesome herping thus far.
I'll start from the beginning of 2015 when I headed south to the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica.
Some views from the flight in.
ImageCosta Rica Mountains by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageGulfo De Dulce by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The first night in the jungle didn't turn up much other than some common things. (ID's/ corrections are welcome)
Gulfo De Dulco Anole
ImageGulfo de Dulce Anole by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Rain Frogs
Image_DSC0061 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Image_DSC0067 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Canopy Anole (AKA Pug Faced Anole)
Image_DSC0148 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Black Striped Snake (Coniophanes)
Image_DSC0171 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Three Toed Sloth and its baby
Image_DSC0202 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Small Boa Constrictor that hung out near the kitchen of the place we were staying.
Image_DSC0207 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

White Faced Capuchin
Image_DSC0224 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Spider Monkey
Image_DSC0257 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

This next snake was one that I have wanted to see my whole life, and thankfully I got to see a few of them.
Fer de Lance (Bothrops asper)
Image_DSC0264 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Image_DSC0273 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The beaches in Costa Rica were ok I guess.
Image_DSC0295 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Masked Treefrog
Image_DSC0329 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Myself and a Cane Toad
Image_DSC0333 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Slaty Tailed Trogon
Image_DSC0397 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Fer de Lance number 2
Image_DSC0461 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Endemic Gulfo de Dulcean Dart Frog
Image_DSC0471 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Whats a jungle trip without a Smokey Jungle Frog?
Image_DSC0487 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

One of my favorite finds of the trip was this Blunt Headed Tree Snake
Image_DSC0491 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Image_DSC0509 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Next up was this massive Lancehead
Image_DSC0526 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Later that night I went back to see the Boa again.
Image_DSC0534 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ID on this skink would be awesome.
Image_DSC0553 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Image_DSC0556 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Hiking the next day found us this Salmon Bellied Racer
Image_DSC0589 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Image_DSC0599 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

View from the top of a hill
Image_DSC0624 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Sunset
Image_DSC0644 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

After that trip I headed back up to Sewanee for second semester and found the usual winter herps.

I did some work this semester monitoring a vernal pond and marking salamanders, so overall this winter I captured and marked about 1500 Spotted Salamanders.
That being said, here is one of them.
ImageSpotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Other inhabitants of the pond
Mole Salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum)
ImageMole Salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Spotted Dusky Salamander (Desmognathus conanti) from a nearby stream.
ImageSpotted Dusky Salamander (Desmognathus conanti) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Going to the pool on rainy nights often yielded me success.
Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) emerging from leaf litter near the pond.
ImageSpotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

As well, cruising roads on rainy nights is always productive.
Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer)
ImageSpring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Two Lined Salamander (Eurycea cirrigera)
ImageTwo Lined Salamander (Eurycea cirrigera) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Other various salamanders from winter outings.
Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum)
ImageSpotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Zig Zag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis)
ImageZig Zag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

One of my other independent studies takes me to a stream that has an awesome pump house
ImageRed Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) habitat. by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

A spot like this always leads to one thing.
Red Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber)
ImageRed Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageRed Salamanders (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

On warm days I'd often go hike bluffs looking for my favorite salamander in the area.
ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) habitat by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

These guys can be a pain to photograph, especially when they won't come out of a crack.
Green Salamander (Aneides aeneus)
ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

And more
ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

I did manage to find this baby one though.
ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

A stream coming out of a cave on the bluff lead to more Reds.
Red Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber)
ImageRed Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageRed Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

One perfectly rainy and warm night in february I headed out to the wetland to see what was moving.
Tons of these.
ImageSpotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Lots of these
Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum)
ImageUpland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Two Pseudacrises
Crucifer and Feriarum
ImageSpring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) and an Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Zig Zag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis)
ImageZig Zag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Southern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus)
ImageSouthern Leopard Frog (Lithobates sphenocephalus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

This guy was a welcome site.
Marbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum)
ImageMarbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

A very pretty Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris)
ImagePickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

One of the weirdest things I saw this semester was this massive Green Salamander hanging out in one of the pitfall traps at the drift fence around the vernal pool. This pool is about a kilometer away from any bluff or what people would call normal Green habitat.
Anyway, she was pretty big, and had a very wide muscular head.
ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Cruising that night turned up some more salamanders.
Two Lined Salamander (Eurycea cirrigera)
ImageTwo Lined Salamander (Eurycea ciriggera) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

These were a welcome site crossing the road.
Four Toed Salamander (Hemidactylum scutatum)
ImageFour Toed Salamander (Hemidactylum scutatum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageFour Toed Salamander (Hemidactylum scutatum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Due to the amazing conditions that night we had quite a few spotteds in our pitfall traps, 666 to be exact, which I spent most of the day marking and collecting data on.
One good thing about it though was that I got to take some studio shots of the animals that were in our traps.
One animal was the wayward Green Salamander (Aneides aeneus) from the night before.
ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The same Green, but with a bit of Red thrown in.
ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) and a Red Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Here's that Red Salamander on his own.
ImageRed Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

A little Mole Salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum)
ImageMole Salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Marbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum)
ImageMarbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

An Ambystoma family photo.
ImageSpotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum), and a Marbled Salamander (Ambystoma opacum), and a Mole Salamander (Ambystoma talpoideum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

An another one of these awesome little guys.
Four Toed Salamander (Hemidactylum scutatum)
ImageFour Toed Salamander (Hemidactylum scutatum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Throughout spring I did lots of cruising on rainy nights and found quite a few amphibians.
Two Lined Salamander (Eurycea cirrigera)
ImageTwo Lined Salamander (Eurycea sp) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageTwo Lined Salamander (Eurycea sp) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus)
ImageAmerican Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Red Salamander (Pseudotrition ruber)
ImageRed Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

And of course, lots of Zig Zag Salamanders (Plethodon dorsalis)
ImageDSC_Zig Zag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis)0592 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageZig Zag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageZig Zag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageZig Zag Salamander (Plethodon dorsalis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Spring Break eventually rolled around and I met up with a few friends way down in South Georgia for a few days of herping.
The first night dealt us a good bit of luck, the first find was one of many Green Tree Frogs (Hyla cinerea)
ImageGreen Tree Frog (Hyla cinerea) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

We also pulled this little Brown Watersnake (Nerodia taxispilota) out of the swamp.
ImageBrown Watersnake (Nerodia taxispilota) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Eastern Spadefoots (Scaphiopus holbrookii) were fairly easy to find.
ImageEastern Spadefoot Toad (Scaphiopus holbrookii) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

We also found this big ole girl, the first of about 70 Banded Watersnakes (Nerodia fasciata) from that trip.
ImageBanded Watersnake (Nerodia fasciata) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

This River Frog (Lithobates hecksheri) was a lifer for me.
ImageRiver Frog (Lithobates heckscheri) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

More night hiking in the swamp gave us this Red Belly Watersnake (Nerodia erythrogaster)
ImageRed Belly Watersnake (Nerodia erythrogaster) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The first hot of the trip was this good sized Eastern Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorous), it wouldn't be the last on of the trip.
ImageEastern Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorous) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Long exposure shot of the swamp at night.
ImageSwamp at night by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

There were plenty of Rough Greensnakes (Opheodrys aestivus) to be found in trees around the campsite.
ImageRough Green Snake (Opheodrys aestivus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageRough Green Snake (Opheodrys aestivus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

It doesn't get much better than swamp camping.
ImageCamping in the swamp by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

We woke up early the next day and got ready to head out to another spot.
ImageMorning in the Swamp by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

We didn't have much luck hiking the sandhills that morning, but cruising some roads around noon pulled up my favorite snake of the trip.
This snake was a major lifer for me and was absolutely magnificent.
Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus)

ImageEastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageEastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Yours truly with the snake
ImageEastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

We decided to take a whole squad photo with the snake.
From left to right
Noah Fields, Josh Young, Daniel Thompson, Chad Feimster and Me (Saunders)
ImageEastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

After that the weather started to get rainy, so we drove down towards Florida to see what we could find.
This Barking Treefrog (Hyla gratiosa) was a welcome lifer.
ImageBarking Treefrog (Hyla gratiosa) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageBarking Treefrog (Hyla gratiosa) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

This lithe Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorous) was found crossing a road.
ImageEastern Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorous) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Dip netting in Florida got us quite a few Two Toed Amphiumas (Amphiuma means)
Imagetwo-toed amphiuma (Amphiuma means) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

This Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea) was another lifer for me.
ImageBlack Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

More Amphiumas
Imagetwo-toed amphiuma (Amphiuma means) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Some of the guys holding them, and trying not to get bit.
Imagetwo-toed amphiuma (Amphiuma means) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Myself with one
Imagetwo-toed amphiuma (Amphiuma means) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

We also saw another Cotton that night, and a heartbreaking DOR mud snake, but other than that the night wound to an end.
The next day saw us driving back to Georgia and to a wonderful place called the Okefenokee Swamp.
ImageMy car by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

This Southern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) was one of many found over the next few days.
ImageSouthern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageSouthern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Another of many Banded Watersnakes (Nerodia fasciata). It's insane how many of these we saw.
ImageBanded Watersnake (Nerodia fasciata) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

That night we did some cruising around the roads outside of the park.
Eastern Garternsakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) were a common sight.
ImageEastern Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

So were these.
ImageBanded Watersnake (Nerodia fasciata) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Another Cottonmouth was found.
ImageEastern Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorous) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Later that night we heard some Little Grass Frogs (Pseudacris occularis) calling from a nearby wetland, these were an unexpectedly small lifer.
ImageLittle Grass Frog (Pseudacris occularis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageLittle Grass Frog (Pseudacris occularis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Squirrel Treefrogs (Hyla squirella) were common around the buildings.
ImageSquirrel Treefrog (Hyla squirella) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The next day we went back to the swamp for some more herping.
First find of the day was this Pinewoods Treefrog (Hyla femoralis)
ImagePine Woods Treefrog (Hyla femoralis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The next snake was a lifer that I'd wanted to find in the wild ever since I was younger and bred them in my room.
Cornsnake (Pantherophis guttatus)
ImageCorn Snake (Pantherophis guttatus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageCorn Snake (Pantherophis guttatus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageCorn Snake (Pantherophis guttatus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The next snake was another lifer for me.
Dusky Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarus barbouri)
ImageDusky Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius barbouri) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageDusky Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius barbouri) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageDusky Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius barbouri) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The guys taking some pictures.
ImagePhotographing a Dusky Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius barbouri) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

American Alligators (Aligator mississippiensis) were a common sight.
ImageAlligator (Aligator mississippiensis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageAlligator (Aligator mississippiensis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Another younger Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus)
ImageSouthern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Another Cornsnake (Pantherophis guttatus) was a nice find.
ImageCorn Snake (Pantherophis guttatus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The rest of that day we cruised around but didn't find much other than nerodia and thamnophis.
The next morning we hopped on a boat and headed deeper into the swamp.
ImageSuwannee River by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

We made land at a small island, and after just 5 minutes of walking around saw this big ole girl.
Canebrake Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) insitu.
ImageCanebrake Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

She had a fantastic rattle string.
ImageDSCCanebrake Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus)_1172 by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Gotta get those photos.
ImageCanebrake Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageCanebrake Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

In habitat
ImageCanebrake Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

While we were photographing the rattler, someone turned this guy up.
Eastern Glass Lizard (Ophisaurus ventralis)
ImageEasterns Glass Lizard (Ophisaurus ventralis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Next snake seen while walking around was this Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) in situ up on this palm.
ImageSouthern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

A Rough Earth Snake (Virginia striatula) also made an appearance.
ImageRough Earth Snake (Virgini striatula) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Next up was a very welcome lifer.
Scarlet Kingsnake (Lampropeltis elapsoides)
Imagescarlet kingsnake (Lampropeltis elapsoides) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Imagescarlet kingsnake (Lampropeltis elapsoides) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Imagescarlet kingsnake (Lampropeltis elapsoides) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Imagescarlet kingsnake (Lampropeltis elapsoides) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Another Racer was found.
ImageSouthern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Habitat
ImagePalmetto and pines by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

This Eastern Ribbonsnake (Thamnophis sauritis) was also seen.
ImageEastern Ribbon Snake (Thamnophis sauritis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

It was from there that we left the swamp and started heading home, but the Okefenokee wasn't done with us yet.
On our way out this little Cotton turned up.
ImageEastern Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorous) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

And then finally, the last snake of the trip was this anerytheristic Dusky Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarus barbouri)
ImageDusky Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius barbouri) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageDusky Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius barbouri) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageDusky Pigmy Rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius barbouri) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

After that the guys and I parted ways and I headed back up to Sewanee in Tennessee, where things were starting to warm up.
First snake of the year in TN was this Smooth Earth Snake (Virginia valeriae)
ImageSmooth Earth Snake (Virginia valeriae) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Another Spotted Dusky (Desmognathus conanti)
ImageSpotted Dusky Salamander (Desmognathus conanti) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

A Red Belly Snake (Storeria occipitomaculatua) was found at a recent burn site.
ImageRedbelly Snake (Storeria occipitomaculata) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

More fossorials turned up while flipping rocks, like this Eastern Wormsnake (Carphophis amoenus amoenus).
ImageEastern worm snake (Carphophis amoenus amoenus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

A Southern Ringneck Snake (Diadophis punctatus)
ImageSouthern Ringneck Snake (Diadophis punctatus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageSouthern Ringneck Snake (Diadophis punctatus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Copes Gray Treefrogs (Hyla chrysoscelis) are becoming a very common sight.
ImageCopes Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

I've been doing a lot of cruising these past few weeks, with a good amount of success.
Two Lined Salamander (Eurycea cirrigera)
ImageTwo Lined Salamander (Eurycea cirrigera) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Red Salamanders (Pseudotriton ruber)
Some ugly
ImageRed Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Some OK
ImageRed Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Some blinding.
ImageRed Salamander (Pseudotriton ruber) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Northern Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus)
ImageNorthern Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

More Copes
ImageCopes Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus)
ImageBullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Americans
ImageAmerican Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

More Copes
ImageCopes Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageCopes Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans)
ImageGreen Frog (Lithobates clamitans) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Long Tail Salamander (Eurycea longicauda)
ImageLong Tailed Salamander (Eurycea longicauda) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Americans
ImageAmerican Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

It's a good thing I love Copes
ImageCopes Gray Treefrog (Hyla chrysoscelis) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Hiking around has brought me some more snakes.
Southern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus)
ImageSouthern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Some basking Snapping Turtles (Chelydra serpentina)
ImageSnapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageSnapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

This nice Midland Ratsnake (Pantherophis spiloides)
ImageMidland Ratsnake (Pantherophis spiliodes) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageMidland Ratsnake (Pantherophis spiliodes) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

The past week or so its been great weather, and cruising has been good to me.
Northern Watersnake (Nerodia sipedon)
ImageNorthern Watersnake (Nerodia sipedon) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Lifer Black Kingsnake (Lampropeltis nigra)
ImageBlack Kingsnake (Lampropeltis nigra) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Brownsnake (Storeria dekayi)
ImageDekays Brownsnake (Storeria dekayi) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Green Treefrog (Hyla cinerea)
ImageGreen Treefrog (Hyla cinerea) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Another Black Racer
ImageSouthern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageSouthern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor priapus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

My most recent cruising turned up some more amphibians.
Northern Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus)
ImageNorthern Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer)
ImageSpring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum)
ImageSpotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

This Northern Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen) was a nice sight to see on the road.
ImageNorthern Copperhead (Agkistrodon contrortrix mokasen) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageNorthern Copperhead (Agkistrodon contrortrix mokasen) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

For some reason Cave Salamanders (Eurycea lucifuga) have been showing up on certain roads.
ImageCave Salamander (Eurycea lucifuga) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

ImageCave Salamander (Eurycea lucifuga) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Also, Sewanee is a pretty cool place, considering that you can cruise Green Salamanders (Aneides aeneus) here.
ImageGreen Salamander (Aneides aeneus) by Saundersdrukk, on Flickr

Thats about it, sorry this post has been so long.
If you want to watch some videos here is the one for the Costa Rica Trip
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCkPF-3F8ZI

And here is the Okefenokee trip.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0W-TIQpvdo

Thanks for looking!

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mtratcliffe
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Re: 2015 so far (Costa Rica, Tennessee, Georgia) lots of pho

Post by mtratcliffe » April 22nd, 2015, 5:26 pm

Woah, you've had quite the year so far! Congrats on all the lifers and thanks for sharing - those are some great finds.

BlackPearl
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Re: 2015 so far (Costa Rica, Tennessee, Georgia) lots of pho

Post by BlackPearl » April 22nd, 2015, 9:47 pm

Nice post!

I believe your Costa Rican racer is a juvenile Salmon-Bellied Racer (Mastigodryas) and not a Barred Racer (Dendrophidian)...

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Saunders
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Re: 2015 so far (Costa Rica, Tennessee, Georgia) lots of pho

Post by Saunders » April 23rd, 2015, 4:52 am

BlackPearl wrote:Nice post!

I believe your Costa Rican racer is a juvenile Salmon-Bellied Racer (Mastigodryas) and not a Barred Racer (Dendrophidian)...
Ah thanks!

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Brian Folt
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Re: 2015 so far (Costa Rica, Tennessee, Georgia) lots of pho

Post by Brian Folt » April 23rd, 2015, 9:40 am

Cool post -- that was certainly a lot of pictures! Here are a couple thoughts:

I believe your first rainfrog is Craugastor fitzingeri, and the second one is likely Pristimantis ridens (most likely) or P. cruentus.

Your Canopy/Pug-nosed Anole (Norops capito) looks a little off to me. I wonder if it may be Norops lemurinus? These can easily be distinguished by dewlap coloration of males.

The skink from Osa may be Ptychoglossus plicatus.

Your first two Two-lined Salamanders look like fairly typical Eurcyea cirrigera, but have you ruled out whether some of the ones beyond which lack the clear dorsolateral lines and have a mottled brown dorsum may be Brown-backed Salamanders (Eurycea wilderae)? I suspect that to the case, but I would be curious if someone else with more experience would chime. The northern extant of the Brown-backed Salamander is unclear, but I know there are some localities from Tennessee.

Nice variation of Red Salamanders. I suspect your pictures show the transition from young and "pretty" to the old, battle-scarred, "ugly" phenotype.

Awesome that you saw a juvenile Green Salamander! I would love to see that some day.

Lastly, cool observations of the River Frog and Little Glassfrog.

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Saunders
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Re: 2015 so far (Costa Rica, Tennessee, Georgia) lots of pho

Post by Saunders » April 23rd, 2015, 10:50 am

Brian Folt wrote:Cool post -- that was certainly a lot of pictures! Here are a couple thoughts:

I believe your first rainfrog is Craugastor fitzingeri, and the second one is likely Pristimantis ridens (most likely) or P. cruentus.

Your Canopy/Pug-nosed Anole (Norops capito) looks a little off to me. I wonder if it may be Norops lemurinus? These can easily be distinguished by dewlap coloration of males.

The skink from Osa may be Ptychoglossus plicatus.

Your first two Two-lined Salamanders look like fairly typical Eurcyea cirrigera, but have you ruled out whether some of the ones beyond which lack the clear dorsolateral lines and have a mottled brown dorsum may be Brown-backed Salamanders (Eurycea wilderae)? I suspect that to the case, but I would be curious if someone else with more experience would chime. The northern extant of the Brown-backed Salamander is unclear, but I know there are some localities from Tennessee.

Nice variation of Red Salamanders. I suspect your pictures show the transition from young and "pretty" to the old, battle-scarred, "ugly" phenotype.

Awesome that you saw a juvenile Green Salamander! I would love to see that some day.

Lastly, cool observations of the River Frog and Little Glassfrog.
Thanks for the ID's!
As for the Two Lined Salamanders, I'm not all that close to where Brown Backs range into TN, but I agree that they are weird for cirrigera. Todd Pierson has been doing work on Two Lineds, I've been giving him my pics for him to analyze so we can figure out just what they are up here, but until that point I've been listing them as cirrigera cause that is what the previous ID was for them in this area before it all got muddled.

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Brian Folt
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Re: 2015 so far (Costa Rica, Tennessee, Georgia) lots of pho

Post by Brian Folt » April 24th, 2015, 11:34 am

The way we identify a given organism to species is by analyzing specific characters, typically morphological, which allow us to diagnose which species is in question. These characters are referred to as diagnostic characters -- because, in theory, they should allow one to diagnosis an organism to species, while excluding all others.

A common error I often see is when folks refer to distribution maps as an important criterion or character for identifying (~diagnosing) an organism to species. For example, someone may rule out identifying an organism as a given species because it was outside of the distribution of said species. In the case of your Two-line Salamanders, I think we shouldn't think about known distributions, but rather look more carefully at morphological descriptions (diagnostic characters) of the species to see if some of your observations key out to Brownback Salamanders. The Brownback Salamander is a morphologically diagnosable species, and species accounts (e.g., in Niemiller & Reynolds 2013 Amphibians of Tennessee) should provide diagnostic characteristics to identify the species.

As for the range of Brownback Salamanders in Tennessee, I am under the impression that this is not well understood at all...so you should be on the look out for new localities! A quick examination of the known localities for the species reported in Timpe et al. (2008) suggests that the species is know from physiographic areas of north Alabama that extend north into Tennessee. I suspect that many populations remain to be discovered for this species! Paper can be found here, I believe free of charge (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar ... 0309001213).

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