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 Post subject: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 19th, 2013, 5:16 pm 
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 4:26 pm
Posts: 689
Location: Gainesville, FL
Anoles, to me one of the coolest of all the lizards. Variable, interesting, far-reaching and to most of your snakes, delicious. I've been intentionally tracking them down wherever I go (and they are) for many a moon. Incase you are not an astute individual, this post is going to have anoles.

First and foremost I will cover the anoles of Florida. Most of which are not initially from the state, much like the people.

This first image illustrates the dewlaps of a few of the different species wild caught here in FL. Clockwise from upper left: Bark Anole (Anolis distichus); Cuban Brown Anole (Anolis sagrei); Cuban Green Anole (Anolis porcatus); Northern Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis); Haitian White Lipped Anole (Anolis coelestinus); Hispaniola Green Anole (Anolis chlorocyanus); Crested Anole (Anolis cristatellus); Large-Headed Anole (Anolis cybotes)

Image
Anolis Dewlaps by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

A native anole, one that many of us are familiar with. If you were like me, I owned at least a couple of these as a child. Although it seems they were once being pushed out of much of their native range in Florida due to the non-native Cuban brown anole (Anolis sagrei), the green anole (A. Anolis carolinensis) is actually doing quite well in less developed areas. While the brown anole usually inhabits lower trunk to ground, the green anole mostly inhabits mid trunk and canopy. I'd say the worst impact on green anoles is development. While brown anoles do fairly well in urban areas, the larger trees that green anoles require, are more scarce.
I digress from my ramblings.

Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis):
Image
Anolis carolinensis carolinensis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis carolinensis carolinensis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

This next green anole is what some refer to as the Southern Green Anole a/k/a Pale-throated Anole. A weak subspecies and probably more likely a dewlap color phase in a certain population. There were males not far from this individual that possessed red dewlaps. This "subspecies" is known to occur from Tampa south to the eastern Everglades.

Southern Green Anole (Anolis carolinensis "seminolus"):
Image
Anolis carolinensis seminolus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Going from the native green to the exotic green. Now found throughout Miami-Dade County and parts of Monroe County.

Cuban Green Anole (Anolis porcatus) female:
Image
Anolis porcatus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

The dark, and sometimes light, vertebral stripe and mottled markings are identifying characteristics of females of this species which strongly resembles our native green anole (A. carolinensis). Males usually also possess strong mottling, but will lack the vertebral stripe and have a much more pronounced nasal crest.

Cuban Green Anole (Anolis porcatus) male:
Image
Anolis porcatus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

I'm adding this next anole since I technically found it in Florida, but doubt that it is actually and established species (and my avatar). Found in Western Broward County near a tropical plant nursery.

Haitian White Lipped Anole (Anolis coelestinus):
Image
Anolis coelestinus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

This next population I've been watching for over seven years, and they seem to be doing fairly well. They also do not seem to have spread any further than a two block radius. They were released from a Haitian reptile importer over 15 years ago.

Hispaniolan Green Anole (Anolis chlorocyanus) female:
Image
Anolis chlorocyanus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Hispaniolan Green Anole (Anolis chlorocyanus) male in-situ:
Image
Anolis chlorocyanus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis chlorocyanus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Hispaniolan Green Anole (Anolis chlorocyanus) juvenile:
Image
Anolis chlorocyanus cyanostictus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

A population of large Jamaican anoles occur in western Miami.

Jamaican Giant Anole (Anolis garmani):
Image
Anolis garmani by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

The largest, and by far the most ferocious, anole. They can be seen face down on the mid and upper trunk of trees or scurrying around chasing their favorite meal...other lizards.

Cuban Knight Anole (Anolis equestris) juvenile:
Image
Anolis equestris by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Cuban Knight Anole (Anolis equestris) adult:
Image
Anolis equestris by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Next up is what some consider a native to Florida, some split into a subspecies of the Bahamian type.

Bark Anole (Anolis distichus distichus):
Image
Anolis distichus distichus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis distichus distichus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

The green subspecies of the bark anole, native to Haiti, is also found in strong numbers near the Miami International Airport.

Green Bark Anole (Anolis distichus dominicensis):
Image
Anolis distichus dominicensis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Now on to the most commonly encountered anole in Florida. If you come to Florida and do not see this species, you are either blind or the next ice age has come early. Variable, aggressive and adaptable, these guys are here to stay.

Cuban Brown Anole (Anolis sagrei):
Image
Anolis sagrei by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis sagrei by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

High-red:
Image
Anolis sagrei by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Although quit similar to the Cuban Brown Anole (A. sagrei), the Puerto Rican Crested Anole (A. cristatellus) has a shorter snout and adult males possess a large, tail crest.

Puerto Rican Crested Anole (Anolis cristatellus) female:
Image
Anolis cristatellus cristatellus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Puerto Rican Crested Anole (Anolis cristatellus) male:
Image
Anolis cristatellus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

This species was released (or escaped) over 10 years ago from a pet dealer near Lake Okeechobee. Distinguishable by their large head, yellow dewlap and light lateral stripe.

Large-head Anole (Anolis cybotes):
Image
Anoles cybotes by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis cybotes by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Since I'm on anoles, these next images are from outside the U.S. Most of which are not YET found in Florida.

This next anole was found in Grand Cayman.

Blue-throated Anole (Anolis conspersus) male:
Image
Anolis conspersus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis conspersus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Blue-throated Anole (Anolis conspersus) female:
Image
Anolis conspersus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis conspersus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Some Jamaican Anoles:

Jamaican Giant Anole (Anolis garmani):
Image
Anolis garmani by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Jamaican Gray Anole (Anolis lineatopus):
Image
Anolis lineatopus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis lineatopus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Opal-bellied Anole (Anolis opalinus) male:
Image
Anolis opalinus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Opal-bellied Anole (Anolis opalinus) female:
Image
Anolis opalinus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Jamaican Turquoise Anole (Anolis graham):
Image
Anolis grahami by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis grahami by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

From Haiti:

Green Bark Anole (Anolis distichus dominicensis):
Image
Anolis distichus dominicensis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Large-head Anole (Anolis cybotes):
Image
Anolis cybotes by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis cybotes by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Some anoles from my recent trip to Amazonian Peru:

Amazon Bark Anole (Anolis ortonii):
Image
Anolis ortonii by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis ortonii by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Blue-lipped Forest Anole (Anolis bombiceps):
Image
Anolis bombiceps by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis bombiceps by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis bombiceps by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Common Forest Anole (Anolis trachyderma):
Image
Anolis trachyderma by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis trachyderma by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis trachyderma by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Amazon Green Anole (Anolis punctatus):
Image
Anolis punctatus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

This next anole's species name says it all; they are all the same species ;)
Banded Tree Anole (Anolis transversalis):
Image
Anolis transversalis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis transversalis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis transversalis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis transversalis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis transversalis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis transversalis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Anolis transversalis by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

Common Monkey Lizard (Polychrus marmoratus):
Image
Polychrus marmoratus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr
Image
Polychrus marmoratus by Jake M. Scott, on Flickr

I have several more trips planned this year that should help me get a few more species knocked off...and my wallet will go on a diet trying. Worth it? Yep. I'll probably see some snakes too....I guess that's cool.

-Jake Scott


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 19th, 2013, 5:27 pm 
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 9:37 am
Posts: 897
Location: NE Ohio
Love it. They are such an interesting family of lizards, so diverse, yet so recognizably all anoles. I was happy to be able to positively ID 3 species in Costa Rica a couple years ago, now I wouldn't mind adding a few more species to my life list.

What is the story on the native status on Bark Anoles in Florida. Do you know the arguments for / against?

Andy


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 19th, 2013, 6:33 pm 
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 3:41 pm
Posts: 2071
Location: Connecticut
Awesome. I'd love to see some of those garmani. A few years back I was pleasantly surprised to see some green anoles in the everglades after days of nothing but brown anoles.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 19th, 2013, 7:02 pm 
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Joined: June 14th, 2010, 11:04 am
Posts: 567
Location: 'God's Country' aka western KY
Wow Jake, that is a lot of anoles. You are the 'anole king'!!! LOL Very impressive collection of pictures and specimens. They really are beautiful dainty creatures hosting a plethora of colors and shapes.

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 19th, 2013, 7:53 pm 
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:28 am
Posts: 1855
Location: FL Keys
Jeezus, Jake, you just blew it for me!
(Now I'll never be able to dismiss every single little lizard making noise in the leaves as "just another stupid Brown Anole" again.) :x


Cool post, I'm really digging these series!

Tim


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 19th, 2013, 9:52 pm 

Joined: April 19th, 2011, 11:38 am
Posts: 37
This post is STUNNING!!! Thank you for sharing an incredible post on one of my absolute favorite family of lizards!


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 19th, 2013, 10:58 pm 
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Joined: June 10th, 2010, 1:38 pm
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Amazing post! Really cool seeing all the different species together like this, really makes me appreciate the diversity more! I'm embarrassed to admit I have a slew of unidentified anole photos from around central america and the carribean, this post motivates me to go back and try to ID some again.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 1:09 am 
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Joined: October 18th, 2011, 12:03 pm
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Location: San Francisco, California
This post was Delight. I too love anoles. When i lived in Jacksonville the yet to be developed areas around my house was twinkling with their presence everywhere like a nation of pixies. Even my porch - though in the first weeks they scattered they soon learned they were in no danger and when i stepped out of my door little green sunbathers would scootch in closer to the inside of the step instead of take off. I would sit on my step alot and they would slip away, only to appear again one by one to resume basking. It was impossible not to herp in Florida, but, no camera - i didnt even think of it in those days it just didnt occur to me! When i left to come back to ca tho, i had a suitcase of journaling and drawings from my time in tucked little wonderlands where i spent my days exploring often from sticky dawn to dusk.
It was Splendid.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 4:12 am 

Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:42 am
Posts: 2247
Such a beautiful and informative post. I thoroughly enjoyed this.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 5:33 am 

Joined: November 4th, 2010, 2:43 pm
Posts: 546
that's no Shushupe
fail


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 5:39 am 
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 4:26 am
Posts: 3430
Location: Illinois
This was an incredible post and wasn't just good it was outstanding. I knew that there was a lot of diversity in Anoles, I had no idea that some of that diversity could be found in Florida. The island and Peruvians bits were the best for me. Some stunning shots, or beautiful lizards assembled here. Kudos for a well done post.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 6:00 am 

Joined: July 8th, 2011, 4:11 pm
Posts: 191
Location: Prattville,Alabama
Fanatastic educational pictoral Jake. As with your mole skink post awhile back, you keep us yearning to see Florida's uncommon and underappreciated species.
Keep it up
Chris


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 7:09 am 
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Joined: October 1st, 2011, 11:01 am
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Location: huntsville
Awesome variety of anolis. :beer:


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 10:24 am 

Joined: April 23rd, 2011, 6:49 pm
Posts: 258
Those transversalis are awesome! A. grahamii was always a favorite of mine in people's collections. There were a few species you posted that I didn't even know were in FL. I spent a lot of time chasing anoles as a kid and found carolinensis, sagrei, both distichus ssp. you mentioned, equestris and cristellatus.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 12:23 pm 

Joined: December 27th, 2012, 9:09 am
Posts: 88
Wow awesome post! I hope to see some of the species pictured here on my trip to FL.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 3:44 pm 
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Joined: November 30th, 2012, 7:45 am
Posts: 492
Location: Fayetteville, Tennessee
I now have a greater appreciation for this genus. The collection of the dewlaps is awesome! I LOVE LOVE LOVE the Puerto Rican crested anole and the banded tree anole (which look like beast little monitors!). I've never heard of a common monkey lizard before :oops: but it's now on my "want" list to add to my herp collection :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 20th, 2013, 7:11 pm 
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 3:56 pm
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Location: New River (Brooker), Florida
Simply stupendous, Jake! I knew you were found of anoles but had no idea you had acquired such a library of photos.

Thanks for taking the time to put this all together for our enjoyment. :beer: :thumb:

Daniel


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 21st, 2013, 8:42 am 

Joined: June 17th, 2010, 4:51 am
Posts: 361
Location: CT
That was an awesome post. I normally dislike finding anoles when I'm in the tropics because I hate trying to figure out what species they are, but this post was very interesting and informative with some great photos.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 21st, 2013, 9:30 am 
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Joined: September 12th, 2010, 1:20 pm
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Location: Jersey, UK
Great post Jake, as others have already said, I always just dismiss a little brown anole scurrying about as another Cuban. You have really opened up my eyes to the variety that is out there.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 21st, 2013, 10:52 am 

Joined: June 7th, 2010, 7:42 pm
Posts: 25
Location: Twin Cities,MN
Awesome post Jake! I love your photos!


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 21st, 2013, 11:56 am 
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Really great! What's the story of Anolis distichus in Florida?


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 21st, 2013, 4:29 pm 

Joined: October 1st, 2012, 11:51 am
Posts: 159
Location: Houston, TX
Great shots and really great variety. The dewlap comparison shots are particularly nice!


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 23rd, 2013, 7:47 am 
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Put up a series of photos showing Anole dewlaps.....and you will have that montage featured on the HN home page. Very cool! We will promote it on FB as well. Well done!

www.HerpNation.com

thanks,
scott


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 23rd, 2013, 9:09 am 
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Joined: June 11th, 2010, 5:06 am
Posts: 271
That is a really enjoyable post! Seeing those anoles was a real treat.

You are probably familiar with Anole Annals?

I would be interested in getting your opinion on the identity of an anole I saw in the Yucatan (near Tulum) a few years ago. Unfortunately, the photo quality is pretty poor. I've gotten a few opinions, but would like to hear more. Any thoughts on what it is?

Thanks,

Mike

Image


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 25th, 2013, 9:58 pm 
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:14 pm
Posts: 3298
Location: San Antonio, TX
Awesome post of a generally underappreciated group of lizards. It's cool (and unfortunate) that so many of those photos are from Florida.

MFB -

EDIT - I think your anole is A. lemurinus based on its head shape. The pattern is remniscent of A. tropidonotus, but I have seen lemurinus with the same "diamondbacked" pattern. (http://www.pbase.com/sandboa/image/120834029.jpg)


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 26th, 2013, 1:27 pm 
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 4:26 pm
Posts: 689
Location: Gainesville, FL
Thanks for the replies everyone! I appreciate it.
I really wish I had more time to put more narrative to the photos in this post. My mind was working and knowing a lot things I wanted to type out, but my fingers (and eyes) were not allowing it by the end of the post.

Chris - I PM'ed Mike. I thought it was A. lemurinus as well. I've seen pictures of them with the diamond pattern, but it was MUCH more faded.

-Jake


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 26th, 2013, 5:32 pm 
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Joined: February 15th, 2011, 8:03 am
Posts: 231
Location: Boone, NC
This really brings me back. Anoles were my favorite things when I would visit my grandparents. I really enjoy the huge diversity of these lizards and how you put them up. Thank you!

-Brad


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 27th, 2013, 5:59 pm 
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Joined: October 18th, 2011, 12:03 pm
Posts: 4131
Location: San Francisco, California
Jake I apologize for my self indulgent post - risking even more candor i was quite lonely in Florida, except for the herps and here on this forum we can share things like anoles on the porch that we really cant with most people.

The post is priceless work and i want to get the dewlaps one especially printed out nice and i want it on my wall. Thanks :)


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: March 2nd, 2013, 7:28 pm 
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Joined: August 11th, 2011, 4:12 pm
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Location: Nashville Tennessee
Awesome post and amazing photography. Thanks for the tutorial!
:beer:


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: March 5th, 2013, 12:24 pm 
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Joined: June 16th, 2010, 12:26 pm
Posts: 561
Jake,

This was an excellent post. Anoles are lovely lizards and it was nice to see photos of so many species set out in a format that made comparison easy.

Regards,
David


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: March 5th, 2013, 4:04 pm 
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Joined: July 8th, 2010, 3:39 pm
Posts: 37
Location: Redondo Beach
Jake,
Great post and photos. Glad someone else loves anoles that much. They are a great lizards. I have always wanted to go around Miami and look for the introduced species. When my grandparents took the family on cruises I always went out and looked for anoles and geckos.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: March 8th, 2013, 10:38 am 
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Joined: March 6th, 2013, 5:55 pm
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Amazing photos Jake! I have recently gotten heavily fascinated by Anoles and will be heading out to look for some of these Anoles to photograph myself. Where abouts did you find the Hispaniolan's, Jamaican Giant's? and the Haitian White Lipped? I would love to get some photo's of those guys. I recently photographed some Cuban Green Anoles and the Green Bark Anoles in a park in North Miami, and have been wanting to find more species since.


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: March 8th, 2013, 5:33 pm 
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Joined: June 9th, 2010, 9:57 pm
Posts: 513
Location: North end of Lake Okeechobee, Florida
Superb post on a very much under-appreciated reptile! And beautiful photography Jake :beer: I can see how an interest in these lizards would make every day of field herping all the more interesting - even on otherwise slow days I imagine you could almost always find some of these guys?


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: February 8th, 2014, 7:08 pm 
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Joined: March 6th, 2013, 5:55 pm
Posts: 2
Hey Jake! Just wanted to inquire on where in Broward you found that White Lipped Anole?


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 Post subject: Re: Anoles - enough said
PostPosted: March 31st, 2018, 6:51 pm 

Joined: May 28th, 2017, 5:02 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Pittstown, NJ
Any one know anything about A. extremus & A. ferreus in Frt. Myers? I wouldn't be surprised if they're extirpated, I heard A. ferrerus was supposedly breading & both were found around the Frt. Myers Country Club, however that's a big area and from the two times I've been there, there is certainly a lot of suitable habitat. Havnt been able to find an articles or paper regarding them. Anyone seen them or have an info?


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